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New panel results on cointegration of international health expenditure and GDP

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  • U. -G. Gerdtham
  • M. Lothgren

Abstract

This article tests for existence of cointegration between health expenditure and GDP using data from 25 OECD countries for the period 19607ndash;1997. The empirical modelling is based on a heterogeneous bivariate vector error correction panel model that allows for trending data as well as intercepts and trends in the cointegrating relations. Univariate country-by-country and panel unit root tests generally fail to reject the null of a unit root in the health expenditure and GDP variables. Country-by-country results based on the Johansen multivariate likelihood-based inference indicate somewhat mixed results on country-specific cointegration with a rank of one found for 12 countries and a rank of zero for the remaining 13 countries. Application of a new panel test for cointegration rank with higher power than the individual tests indicates that health expenditure and GDP are cointegrated around linear trends.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2002)
Issue (Month): 13 ()
Pages: 1679-1686

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:13:p:1679-1686

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Cited by:
  1. de Mello-Sampayo, Felipa & de Sousa-Vale, Sofia, 2012. "Financing Health Care Expenditure in the OECD Countries: Evidence from a Heterogeneous, Cross-Sectionally Dependent Panel," MPRA Paper 41073, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Dreger, C. & Reimers, H.E., 2005. "Health Care Expenditures in OECD Countries: A Panel Unit Root and Cointegration Analysis," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 2(2), pages 5-20.
  3. Badi H. Baltagi & Francesco Moscone, 2010. "Health Care Expenditure and Income in the OECD Reconsidered: Evidence from Panel Data," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 120, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  4. Boboc, Cristina & Driouchi, Ahmed & Titan, Emilia, 2010. "Interrelations between Education, Health, Income and Economic Development in Europe with Emphasis on New Members of European Union," MPRA Paper 22235, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Apr 2010.
  5. Marwa Farag & A. NandaKumar & Stanley Wallack & Dominic Hodgkin & Gary Gaumer & Can Erbil, 2012. "The income elasticity of health care spending in developing and developed countries," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 145-162, June.
  6. Andrew Hallett & Christian Richter, 2006. "Measuring the Degree of Convergence among European Business Cycles," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 27(2), pages 229-259, May.
  7. Zijun Wang & Andrew J. Rettenmaier, 2007. "A note on cointegration of health expenditures and income," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 559-578.
  8. Carla Massidda & Paolo Mattana, 2008. "Regional productivity and relative prices dynamics: the case of Italy," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 945-966, December.
  9. Roel van Elk & Esther Mot & P.H. Franses, 2009. "Modelling health care expenditures; overview of the literature and evidence from a panel time series model," CPB Discussion Paper 121, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  10. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2010. "Modelling health and output at business cycle horizons for the USA," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 872-880.
  11. Christian Richter & Andrew Hughes Hallett, 2005. "A Time-Frequency Analysis of the Coherences of the US Business," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 45, Society for Computational Economics.

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