Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Advertising in consumer allocation models: choice of functional form

Contents:

Author Info

  • Martyn Duffy
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This study investigates the empirical performance of four different functional forms for advertising-augmented consumer allocation models. The investigation is carried out within the context of the UK alcoholic drinks markets. The aims of the study are twofold: (i) to assess which of the four functional forms provides the best explanation of the data and may serve, therefore, as the most suitable framework for investigating advertising effects in these markets; and (ii) to consider whether the findings with regard to advertising effects are robust and consistent across model specifications. Advertising is found to have had no significant effect upon the 'product composition' or 'level' of total alcoholic drink consumption in the UK over the period from 1964 to 1996, and this result is robust with respect to variations in the specification of functional form. The consumption of alcoholic drink is affected by relative prices, total consumer budgeted expenditures and, to some extent, by autonomous shifts in tastes. The balance of the evidence from tests for functional form appeared to favour the Almost Ideal Demand system as a framework for investigating the influence of advertising and other factors on drink consumption.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840121721
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 437-456

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:4:p:437-456

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAEC20

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Henry Saffer & Dhaval Dave, 2003. "Alcohol Advertising and Alcohol Consumption by Adolescents," NBER Working Papers 9676, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Saroja Selvanathan, 2006. "How similar are alcohol drinkers? International evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(12), pages 1353-1362.
    3. Martyn Duffy, 2006. "Tobacco consumption and policy in the United Kingdom," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(11), pages 1235-1257.
    4. Duffy, Martyn, 2003. "On the estimation of an advertising-augmented, cointegrating demand system," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 181-206, January.
    5. Duffy, Martyn, 2003. "Advertising and food, drink and tobacco consumption in the United Kingdom: a dynamic demand system," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 51-70, January.
    6. Nelson, Jon P., 2001. "Alcohol Advertising and Advertising Bans: A Survey of Research Methods, Results, and Policy Implications," Working Papers 7-01-2, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Camilo Sarmiento & Richard Just, 2005. "Empirical modelling of the aggregation error in the representative consumer model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(10), pages 1163-1175.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:33:y:2001:i:4:p:437-456. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.