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Government expenditure and economic growth: evidence from G7 countries

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  • Bharat Kolluri
  • Michael Panik
  • Mahmoud Wahab
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    Abstract

    This paper examines Wagner's Law of Public Expenditure, which emphasizes economic growth as the fundamental determinant of public sector growth, using time series data drawn from the G7 industrialized countries over the sample period 1960 1993. It presents evidence on both the short- and long-run effects of growth in national income on government expenditure by resorting to recent developments in the theory of cointegrated processes. An attempt is also made in this study to examine if Wagner's Law holds between certain key components of government expenditure and income.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368400322110
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 8 ()
    Pages: 1059-1068

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:8:p:1059-1068

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20

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    Cited by:
    1. Christoph A. Schaltegger & Benno Torgler, 2004. "Growth Effects of Public Expenditure on the State and Local Level: Evidence from a Sample of Rich Governments," CREMA Working Paper Series 2004-16, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    2. Suleiman Abu-Bader & Aamer Abu-Qarn, 2003. "Government Expenditures, Military Spending and Economic Growth: Causality Evidence from Egypt, Israel and Syria," Working Papers 163, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    3. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Nielsen, Ingrid & Smyth, Russell, 2008. "Panel data, cointegration, causality and Wagner's law: Empirical evidence from Chinese provinces," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 297-307, June.
    4. Cosimo Magazzino, 2012. "The Nexus between Disaggregated Public Spending and GDP in the Euro Area," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 2560-2579.
    5. Saten Kumar & Don J. Webber & Scott Fargher, 2012. "Wagner's Law revisited: cointegration and causality tests for New Zealand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(5), pages 607-616, February.
    6. V. Chandran Govindaraju & Ramesh Rao & Sajid Anwar, 2011. "Economic growth and government spending in Malaysia: a re-examination of Wagner and Keynesian views," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 203-219, August.
    7. Mahmoud Wahab, 2004. "Economic growth and government expenditure: evidence from a new test specification," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(19), pages 2125-2135.
    8. Dimitrios Sideris, 2007. "Wagner's Law in 19th Century Greece: A Cointegration and Causality Analysis," Working Papers 64, Bank of Greece.
    9. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2012. "Wagner versus Keynes: Public spending and national income in Italy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 890-905.
    10. Evan Osborne, 2004. "Corruption and Its Alternatives: A Takeoff Theory of Good Governance," ISER Discussion Paper 0604, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    11. Mohammed MoosaAgeli, 2013. "Wagner’s Law in Saudi Arabia 1970 - 2012: An Econometric Analysis," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(5), pages 647-659, May.
    12. Kumar, Saten, 2009. "Further Evidence on Public Spending and Economic Growth in East Asian Countries," MPRA Paper 19298, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2010. "Wagner's law and Italian disaggregated public spending: some empirical evidences," MPRA Paper 26662, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Sinha, Dipendra, 2007. "Does the Wagner’s Law hold for Thailand? A Time Series Study," MPRA Paper 2560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Wing Yuk, 2005. "Government Size and Economic Growth: Time-Series Evidence for the United Kingdom, 1830-1993," Econometrics Working Papers 0501, Department of Economics, University of Victoria.
    16. Alfonso Arpaia & Alessandro Turrini, 2008. "Government expenditure and economic growth in the EU: long-run tendencies and short-term adjustment," European Economy - Economic Papers 300, Directorate General Economic and Monetary Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    17. Michael E. S. Hoffman, 2005. "Political and Public Finance Motives for Tariffs," International Trade 0510016, EconWPA.
    18. Muthi Samudram & Mahendhiran Nair & Santha Vaithilingam, 2009. "Keynes and Wagner on government expenditures and economic development: the case of a developing economy," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 697-712, June.

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