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Exchange rate appreciation and export competitiveness. The case of Singapore

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  • Tilak Abeysinghe
  • Tan Lin Yeok

Abstract

Policy prescriptions have generally assumed that exchange rate depreciation would stimulate exports and curtail imports, while exchange rate appreciation would be detrimental to exports and encourage imports. This prediction has, however, often neglected to consider the existence of the import content of exports, as well as the dynamic effects of productivity improvements. Our paper seeks to show empirically, the significance of these two factors in affecting the competitiveness of Singapore's exports. Specifically, the paper shows that in the presence of high import content, exports are not adversely affected by currency appreciation because the lower import prices due to appreciation reduce the cost of export production. In the case of Singapore, this cushioning effect outweighs that of the effect of productivity gains on export competitiveness. The service exports, however, with a very low import content tend to suffer from currency appreciation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 51-55

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:30:y:1998:i:1:p:51-55

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Cited by:
  1. Fang, WenShwo & Lai, YiHao & Thompson, Henry, 2007. "Exchange rates, exchange risk, and Asian export revenue," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 237-254.
  2. Cumperayot, Phornchanok & Keijzer, Tjeert & Kouwenberg, Roy, 2006. "Linkages between extreme stock market and currency returns," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 528-550, April.
  3. Athukorala, Premachandra & Menon, Jayant, 1994. "Pricing to Market Behaviour and Exchange Rate Pass-Through in Japanese Exports," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 271-81, March.
  4. Bhanumurthy, N.R. & Sharma, Chandan, 2013. "Does Weak Rupee Matter for India's Manufacturing Exports?," Working Papers 13/115, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
  5. repec:ltr:wpaper:1994.08 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. WenShwo Fang & YiHao Lai & Stephen M. Miller, 2005. "Does Exchange Rate Risk Affect Exports Asymmetrically? Asian Evidence," Working papers 2005-09, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  7. Wang, Jiao & Ji, Andy G., 2006. "Exchange rate sensitivity of China’s bilateral trade flows," BOFIT Discussion Papers 19/2006, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  8. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Jayant Manon, 1994. "Exchange Rates and Strategic Pricing: the Case of Swedish Machinery Exports," Working Papers 1994.08, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
  9. WenShwo Fang & YiHao Lai & Stephen M. Miller, 2005. "Export Promotion through Exchange Rate Policy: Exchange Rate Depreciation or Stabilization?," Working papers 2005-07, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  10. Najia Saqib, 2014. "The Effect of Exchange Rate Fluctuation on Trade Balance: Empirical Evidence from Saudi Arab Economy Classification-JEL:," Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology, ScientificPapers.org, vol. 4(1), pages 1, February.
  11. Wilson, Peter & Tat, Kua Choon, 2001. "Exchange rates and the trade balance: the case of Singapore 1970 to 19961," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 47-63.
  12. Tilak Abeysinghe & Keen Meng Choy, 2005. "Modelling Small Economy Exports: The Case of Singapore," SCAPE Policy Research Working Paper Series 0501, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics, SCAPE.
  13. WenShwo Fang & Stephen Miller, 2007. "Exchange rate depreciation and exports: the case of Singapore revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 273-277.

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