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Futures trading activity and stock price volatility: some extensions

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  • A. Chatrath
  • F. Song
  • B. Adrangi
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    Abstract

    An earlier investigation by Bessembinder and Seguin employed open interest data to demonstrate that heavy (unexpected) trading activity in stock index futures is destabilizing. This article re-examines the issue in the framework of the commitments of four groups of traders in the S&P 500 index futures market: hedgers (institutional traders), large speculators, small traders and spreaders. Finding that surges in institutional commitments in index futures are followed by increased levels of price variability. The results are not conclusive on whether portfolio insurance strategies contribute to this relationship. Moreover, there is no evidence that the participation of other futures traders, notably large speculators and small traders, is destabilizing. An implication is that the current margins structure that favours institutional traders is ill-suited to the goal of volatility-control. The release of the commitment of trader data which provides open interest information on an ex post basis is found to have no impact on stock market volatility. Thus, the positive relationship between surges in institutional futures activity and volatility seems to stem from trading mechanisms, rather than from the formal disclosure of commitment of traders.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09603100110115183
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Financial Economics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 9 ()
    Pages: 655-664

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:13:y:2003:i:9:p:655-664

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAFE20

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    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Stéphane Yen & Ming-Hsiang Chen, 2010. "Open interest, volume, and volatility: evidence from Taiwan futures markets," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 113-141, April.
    2. Bhargava, Vivek & Malhotra, D.K., 2007. "The relationship between futures trading activity and exchange rate volatility, revisited," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 95-111, April.
    3. Evangelos Drimbetas & Nikolaos Sariannidis & Nicos Porfiris, 2007. "The effect of derivatives trading on volatility of the underlying asset: evidence from the Greek stock market," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 139-148.
    4. Nikolaos Sariannidis & Evangelos Drimbetas, 2008. "Impact of international volatility and the introduction of Individual Stock Futures on the volatility of a small market," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(3), pages 119-.
    5. Röthig, Andreas, 2008. "The Impact of Backwardation on Hedgers' Demand for Currency Futures Contracts: Theory versus Empirical Evidence," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 35698, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute of Economics (VWL).

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