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Volatility changes caused by the trading system: a Markov switching application

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  • Patricia Chelley-Steeley
  • Yan Li

Abstract

An expanding literature exists to suggest that the trading mechanism can influence the volatility of security returns. This study adds to this literature by examining the impact that the introduction of SETS, on the London Stock Exchange, had on the volatility of security returns. Using a Markov switching regime change model security volatility is categorized as being in a regime of either high or low volatility. It is shown that prior to the introduction of SETS securities tended to be in a low volatility regime. At the time SETS was introduced securities moved to a high volatility regime. This suggests that volatility increased when SETS was introduced.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor and Francis Journals in its journal Applied Financial Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 1 (2005)
Issue (Month): 6 (November)
Pages: 373-380

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apfelt:v:1:y:2005:i:6:p:373-380

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  1. Harrison Hong & Jiang Wang, 2000. "Trading and Returns under Periodic Market Closures," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(1), pages 297-354, 02.
  2. Hamilton, James D. & Susmel, Raul, 1994. "Autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity and changes in regime," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1-2), pages 307-333.
  3. John Board & Charles Sutcliffe, 1996. "Trade Transparency and the London Stock Exchange," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 2(3), pages 355-365.
  4. Stoll, Hans R & Whaley, Robert E, 1990. "Stock Market Structure and Volatility," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 37-71.
  5. Biais, Bruno, 1993. " Price Information and Equilibrium Liquidity in Fragmented and Centralized Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(1), pages 157-85, March.
  6. Huang, Roger D. & Stoll, Hans R., 1996. "Dealer versus auction markets: A paired comparison of execution costs on NASDAQ and the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 313-357, July.
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