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Testing the home-country self-employment hypothesis on immigrants in Sweden

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Author Info

  • Mats Hammarstedt
  • Ghazi Shukur

Abstract

This article tests the home-country self-employment hypothesis on immigrants in Sweden. The results show that the self-employment rates vary between different immigrant groups but we find no support for the home-country self-employment hypothesis using traditional estimation methods. However, when applying quantile regression method we find such evidence when testing results from the 90th quantile. This indicates that home-country self-employment traditions are important for the self-employment decision among immigrant groups with high self-employment rates in Sweden. Furthermore, the result underlines the importance of utilizing robust estimation methods when the home-country self-employment hypothesis is tested.

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File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/13504850701221907&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 16 (2009)
Issue (Month): 7 ()
Pages: 745-748

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:16:y:2009:i:7:p:745-748

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Cited by:
  1. Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere & Willie Belton, 2012. "Coming to America: Does Having a Developed Home Country Matter for Self-Employment in the United States?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 538-42, May.
  2. Lina Andersson & Mats Hammarstedt, 2011. "Transmission of self-employment across immigrant generations: the importance of ethnic background and gender," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 555-577, December.
  3. Lina Andersson, 2011. "Occupational choice and returns to self-employment among immigrants," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(8), pages 900-922, November.
  4. Lina Andersson & Mats Hammarstedt, 2010. "Intergenerational transmissions in immigrant self-employment: Evidence from three generations," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 261-276, April.
  5. Simoes, Nadia & Moreira, Sandrina B. & Crespo, Nuno, 2013. "Individual Determinants of Self-Employment Entry – What Do We Really Know?," MPRA Paper 48403, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Andersson, Lina & Hammarstedt, Mats & Hussain, Shakir & Shukur, Ghazi, 2011. "Ethnic origin, local labour markets and self-employment in Sweden: A Multilevel Approach," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 261, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.

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