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Modelling the structural break in volatility

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  • Konstantin Kholodilin
  • Vincent Wenxiong Yao

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that US and other developed economies have become considerably stabilized in terms of volatility since the mid-1980s (Stock and Watson, 2002). This study models the structural break in volatility using a dynamic factor model with two state variables: one capturing cyclical fluctuations and another reflecting volatility decline. The new model confirms a one-time volatility reduction in the US economy in February 1984. Four-regime models appear to outperform two-regime models.

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File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/13504850500398542&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 13 (2006)
Issue (Month): 7 ()
Pages: 417-422

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:7:p:417-422

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  1. Francis X. Diebold & Glenn D. Rudebusch, 1994. "Measuring Business Cycles: A Modern Perspective," NBER Working Papers 4643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Andrews, Donald W K & Ploberger, Werner, 1994. "Optimal Tests When a Nuisance Parameter Is Present Only under the Alternative," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(6), pages 1383-1414, November.
  3. Jushan Bai & Pierre Perron, 1998. "Estimating and Testing Linear Models with Multiple Structural Changes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(1), pages 47-78, January.
  4. Mohamed Safouane Ben Aissa & Jamel Jouini, 2003. "Structural breaks in the US inflation process," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(10), pages 633-636.
  5. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Has the Business Cycle Changed and Why?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2002, Volume 17, pages 159-230 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. J. Jouini & M. Boutahar, 2003. "Structural breaks in the U.S. inflation process: a further investigation," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(15), pages 985-988.
  7. Mohamed Safouane Ben Aissa & Mohamed Boutahar & Jamel Jouini, 2004. "Bai and Perron's and spectral density methods for structural change detection in the US inflation process," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 109-115.
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Cited by:
  1. Výrost, Tomáš & Baumöhl, Eduard & Lyócsa, Štefan, 2011. "On the relationship of persistence and number of breaks in volatility: new evidence for three CEE countries," MPRA Paper 27927, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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