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Crime and community heterogeneity: race, ethnicity, and religion

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  • Michelle Trawick
  • Roy Howsen

Abstract

Prior studies have explored the relationship between race and religion and their effect on various crimes. In the USA race is typically defined as the proportion of a community that is African-American or nonwhite. Likewise, religion is defined as the proportion of a community that adheres to any religious denomination. This study extends earlier work by employing Herfindahl indices as measures of community homogeneity with respect to race and ethnicity as well as religious denominations. It also measures religiosity based on four different denominational groups, rather than religiosity as an aggregate. Results indicate that as a community's degree of homogeneity increases, in terms of both race/ethnicity and religion, crime decreases; and that the effects of religion on crime may vary by denomination.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 13 (2006)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 341-345

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:6:p:341-345

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  1. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 2000. "Participation In Heterogeneous Communities," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 847-904, August.
  2. Alesina, Alberto F & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2000. "Who Trusts Others?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2646, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Caroline Elliott & Dan Ellingworth, 1998. "Exploring the relationship between unemployment and property crime," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(8), pages 527-530.
  4. Ziggy MacDonald, 2000. "The impact of under-reporting on the relationship between unemployment and property crime," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(10), pages 659-663.
  5. Ehrlich, Isaac, 1973. "Participation in Illegitimate Activities: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 521-65, May-June.
  6. Morgan Kelly, 2000. "Inequality And Crime," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(4), pages 530-539, November.
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Cited by:
  1. Ng, Irene Y.H., 2010. "Where juvenile serious offenders live: A neighborhood analysis of Wayne County, Michigan," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 207-215, March.

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