Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The added worker effect over the business cycle: evidence from urban Mexico

Contents:

Author Info

  • Susan Parker
  • Emmanuel Skoufias

Abstract

This paper investigates whether the added worker effect is an important determinant of the increased labour force participation by women and whether the magnitude of the added worker effect differs between the peak and trough of the business cycle. Use is made of repeated observations from spouses in urban Mexico, collected during the Peso crisis (1994:4-1995:4) and during the period of economic prosperity (1998:4-1999:4). Significant added worker effects are found in both periods. The magnitude of the added worker effect during the crisis period is found to be twice as large as that observed during the period of economic prosperity.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/1350485042000235693&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 11 (2004)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 625-630

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:10:p:625-630

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEL20

Order Information:
Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAEL20

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Parker, 2006. "Job loss and family adjustments in work and schooling during the Mexican peso crisis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 163-181, February.
  2. Cullen, Julie Berry & Gruber, Jonathan, 2000. "Does Unemployment Insurance Crowd Out Spousal Labor Supply?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 546-72, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Menon, Nidhiya & Rodgers, Yana van der Meulen, 2011. "War and women's work : evidence from the conflict in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5745, The World Bank.
  2. Shwetlena Sabarwal & Nistha Sinha & Mayra Buvinic, 2011. "How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks? What We Know," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10113, The World Bank.
  3. Kathryn Graddy & Jonathan Hamilton, 2014. "Auction House Guarantees for Works of Art," Working Papers 71, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  4. Sabarwal, Shwetlena & Sinha, Nistha & Buvinic, Mayra, 2010. "How do women weather economic shocks ? a review of the evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5496, The World Bank.
  5. Julia Bredtmann & Sebastian Otten & Christian Rulff, 2014. "Husband’s Unemployment and Wife’s Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 0484, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  6. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "Impact of the 2008-2009 Food, Fuel, and Financial Crisis On the Philippine Labor Market," Working Papers 17, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  7. Huang, Fung-Mey & Luh, Yir-Hueih & Huang, Fung-Yea, 2012. "Unemployment information and wives’ labor supply responses to husbands’ job loss in Taiwan," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1176-1194.
  8. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2013. "The Economic Crisis of 2008 and the Added Worker Effect in Transition Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_765, Levy Economics Institute.
  9. Bhalotra, Sonia & Umana-Aponte, Marcela, 2012. "Women.s Labour Supply and Household Insurance in Africa," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  10. Sabarwal, Shwetlena & Sinha, Nistha & Buvinic, Mayra, 2011. "How Do Women Weather Economic Shocks? What We Know," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 46, pages 1-6, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:10:p:625-630. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.