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Measuring Housework Participation: The Gap between “Stylised” Questionnaire Estimates and Diary-based Estimates

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  • Man Kan

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-007-9184-5
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 86 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 381-400

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:86:y:2008:i:3:p:381-400

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Related research

    Keywords: Housework; Measurement error; Time-diary method; Time use;

    References

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    1. repec:ese:iserwp:2007-03 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Juster, F. Thomas & Stafford, Frank P., 1990. "The Allocation of Time: Empirical Findings, Behavioural Models, and Problems of Measurement," Working Paper Series, Research Institute of Industrial Economics 258, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Jens Bonke, 2005. "Paid Work and Unpaid Work: Diary Information Versus Questionnaire Information," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 70(3), pages 349-368, 02.
    4. Michael Bittman & Paula England & Nancy Folbre & George Matheson, 2001. "When Gender Trumps Money: Bargaining and Time in Household Work," JCPR Working Papers 221, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    5. Jonathan Gershuny, 2004. "Costs and Benefits of Time Sampling Methodologies," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 67(1), pages 247-252, June.
    6. Iiris Niemi, 1993. "Systematic error in behavioural measurement: Comparing results from interview and time budget studies," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 229-244, November.
    7. Gershuny, Jonathan, 2000. "Changing Times: Work and Leisure in Postindustrial Society," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287872, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. Frances Goldscheider & Eva Bernhardt & Maria Brandén, 2013. "Domestic gender equality and childbearing in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(40), pages 1097-1126, December.
    2. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina, 2014. "Regional unemployment, gender, and time allocation of the unemployed," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 105-127, March.
    3. Cristina Borra & Almudena Sevilla & Jonathan Gershuny, 2013. "Calibrating Time-Use Estimates for the British Household Panel Survey," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 1211-1224, December.
    4. Christina Boll & Julian Leppin & Nora Reich, 2014. "Paternal childcare and parental leave policies: evidence from industrialized countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 129-158, March.
    5. J. Gimenez-Nadal & Jose Molina & Almudena Sevilla-Sanz, 2012. "Social norms, partnerships and children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 215-236, June.
    6. Judith Brown & Jan Nicholson & Dorothy Broom & Michael Bittman, 2011. "Television Viewing by School-Age Children: Associations with Physical Activity, Snack Food Consumption and Unhealthy Weight," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 101(2), pages 221-225, April.
    7. Man Kan & Jonathan Gershuny, 2009. "Calibrating Stylised Time Estimates Using UK Diary Data," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 239-243, August.

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