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Life Conditions and Opportunities of Young Adults: Evidence from Italy in European Comparative Perspective

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  • Antonella D’Agostino

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  • Andrea Regoli
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    Abstract

    This paper originates from the current political debate on the vulnerability and lack of opportunities of the young people in Italy that may stand in the way of enjoying a “good quality of life”. In particular, we refer to three basic life outcomes, namely “having enough money”, “enjoying an adequate life standard” and “enjoying good health” that summarize the aspirations of many young people. The paper is intended not only to stress the particular features for the Italian case but also to present a comparative analysis across the European Countries. Moreover, the discussion on the above issues is referred to the group of individuals between 26 and 40 years-old since this group includes different generations of young people facing different opportunities to achieve independent adult life in the presence of a wide range of educational, employment, housing or social-welfare policies that might support or hinder the autonomisation process. In detail, we use a life-course causal model in order to study how, for every individual, the current outcomes may be even strongly related to past outcomes and we highlight that the understanding of the causes of “succeeding in life” in a comparative perspective across Europe can be an useful tool for Italian policy makers in order to pursue the goal of planning a future for Italian younger generations. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-012-0136-3
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 1205-1235

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:1205-1235

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Related research

    Keywords: Young adults; Good quality of life; Opportunity and disadvantage; Life-course casual model;

    References

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