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The Patterns of Satisfaction Among Immigrants in Germany

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  • Ognjen Obućina

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    Abstract

    Using the data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, the paper focuses on the analysis of life satisfaction and income satisfaction among immigrants in Germany. The results suggest that it cannot be argued that Germany’s immigrants are, ceteris paribus, more satisfied or less satisfied than natives, since some immigrant groups appear to be more satisfied, while others show lower satisfaction levels relative to natives. Separate estimations for natives and immigrants show that, even though the patterns of satisfaction for the two groups are largely similar, several notable differences emerge. The final goal was to take a closer look at the negative relationship between satisfaction and duration of stay in Germany. After constructing reference groups by the timing of arrival, the negative relationship between income satisfaction and years since migration is reduced substantially. On the other hand, the negative association between duration of stay and life satisfaction is persistent, regardless of the way the reference groups are defined. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-012-0130-9
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 1105-1127

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:1105-1127

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Related research

    Keywords: Immigrant satisfaction; Life satisfaction; Income satisfaction; Reference groups; Germany;

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