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The Well-Being of the Canadian Arctic Inuit: The Relevant Weight of Economy in the Happiness Equations

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  • Roberson Édouard

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  • Gérard Duhaime

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    Abstract

    Which of the three dimensions of Allardt’s model, “having, loving, and being”, best predicts the incidence of subjective feeling of well-being among the Canadian Arctic Inuit adults? To answer this question, two logistic regression equations have been constructed, one based on a negative assessment of well-being (feeling of despair), and the other on a positive assessment (satisfaction with life in the community). Each of them took first the form of a global model, and then of three scale models, one for each dimension of the Allardt’s model. The equations are likely to be more effective for predicting the incidence of Inuit’s feeling of satisfaction than for anticipating their feeling of despair. Furthermore, the “being” scale model is the one that will have contributed most to the predictive performance of the global model. In other words, what the Inuit “ARE” contributes more to the incidence of their satisfaction with life than what they “HAVE” or what they “LOVE”. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-012-0098-5
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 (August)
    Pages: 373-392

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:1:p:373-392

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Keywords: Well-being; Inuit; Economy; Canadian Arctic; Living conditions;

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    1. DiTella, Rafael & MacCulloch, Robert & Oswald, Andrew J., 1999. "The macroeconomics of happiness," ZEI Working Papers B 03-1999, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies, University of Bonn.
    2. Takis Venetoklis & Heikki Ervasti, 2006. "Unemployment and Subjective Well-being: Does Money Make a Difference," Discussion Papers 391, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
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    11. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, . "What can Economists Learn from Happiness Research?," IEW - Working Papers 080, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    12. Easterlin, Richard A. & Angelescu McVey, Laura & Switek, Malgorzata & Sawangfa, Onnicha & Zweig, Jacqueline Smith, 2011. "The Happiness-Income Paradox Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 5799, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
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