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The Relevance of Objective and Subjective Social Position for Self-Rated Health: A Combined Approach for the Swedish Context

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  • Alexander Miething

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    Abstract

    The study investigates the health effects of subjective class position stratified by objective social position. Four types of subjective class were analysed separately for individuals with manual or non-manual occupational background. The cross-sectional analysis is based on the Swedish Level-of-Living Survey from 2000 and includes 4,139 individuals. The dataset comprises information on perceived class affinity and occupational position that was combined to conduct logistic regression models on self-rated health. An inverse relationship between self-rated health and the eight combinations of objective and subjective social position was found. Lower socio-economic position was associated with poor health. The largest adverse health effects were found for lower subjective social position in combination with lower occupational position. When the covariates education, father’s occupational position and income were added to the model, adverse effects on health remained only for females. Subjective social position helps to explain health inequalities. Substantial gender differences were found. It can be assumed that subjective class position captures a wide range of perceived inequalities and therefore complements the measure of occupational position. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-011-9988-1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 161-173

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:111:y:2013:i:1:p:161-173

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Keywords: Subjective social position; Objective social position; Health inequalities; Self-rated health; Sweden;

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    1. Johanna Lundberg & Margareta Kristenson, 2008. "Is Subjective Status Influenced by Psychosocial Factors?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 89(3), pages 375-390, December.
    2. Wilkinson, Richard G. & Pickett, Kate E., 2007. "The problems of relative deprivation: Why some societies do better than others," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(9), pages 1965-1978, November.
    3. Kondo, Naoki & Kawachi, Ichiro & Subramanian, S.V. & Takeda, Yasuhisa & Yamagata, Zentaro, 2008. "Do social comparisons explain the association between income inequality and health?: Relative deprivation and perceived health among male and female Japanese individuals," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(6), pages 982-987, September.
    4. Matthews, Sharon & Manor, Orly & Power, Chris, 1999. "Social inequalities in health: are there gender differences?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 49-60, January.
    5. Ritterman, Miranda Lucia & Fernald, Lia C. & Ozer, Emily J. & Adler, Nancy E. & Gutierrez, Juan Pablo & Syme, S. Leonard, 2009. "Objective and subjective social class gradients for substance use among Mexican adolescents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 1843-1851, May.
    6. Sakurai, Keiko & Kawakami, Norito & Yamaoka, Kazue & Ishikawa, Hirono & Hashimoto, Hideki, 2010. "The impact of subjective and objective social status on psychological distress among men and women in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1832-1839, June.
    7. Demakakos, Panayotes & Nazroo, James & Breeze, Elizabeth & Marmot, Michael, 2008. "Socioeconomic status and health: The role of subjective social status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 330-340, July.
    8. Wolff, Lisa S. & Subramanian, S.V. & Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores & Weber, Deanne & Kawachi, Ichiro, 2010. "Compared to whom? Subjective social status, self-rated health, and referent group sensitivity in a diverse US sample," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2019-2028, June.
    9. Macleod, John & Davey Smith, George & Metcalfe, Chris & Hart, Carole, 2005. "Is subjective social status a more important determinant of health than objective social status? Evidence from a prospective observational study of Scottish men," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(9), pages 1916-1929, November.
    10. Bengt Starrin & Cecilia Åslund & Kent Nilsson, 2009. "Financial Stress, Shaming Experiences and Psychosocial Ill-Health: Studies into the Finances-Shame Model," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 91(2), pages 283-298, April.
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