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Higher education and growth performance of Pakistan: evidence from multivariate framework

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  • Wasim Qazi

    ()

  • Syed Raza

    ()

  • Syed Jawaid

    ()

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between higher education and economic growth in Pakistan by using the annual time series data from the period of 1980–2011. The ARDL bound testing cointegration approach confirms the valid positive relationship between higher education development and economic growth in long run as well as in short run. Results of Granger causality test, Toda and Yamamoto Modified Wald causality test and variance decomposition test confirm the bidirectional causal relationship between higher education and economic growth in Pakistan. Results of rolling window estimations suggest that the contribution of higher education in economic growth is significantly increased after the formation of higher education commission of Pakistan in 2002. It is clear from our findings that higher education commission plays an important role in the development of higher education in Pakistan which leads to enhance economic growth. It is recommended that policy makers should make policies to strengthen the higher education commission to ensure continuous and rapid economic growth in Pakistan. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11135-013-9866-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Quality & Quantity.

Volume (Year): 48 (2014)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 1651-1665

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Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:48:y:2014:i:3:p:1651-1665

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; Higher education; Time series analysis;

References

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