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Identifying some major determinants of entrepreneurial partnership, using a confounded factorial conjoint choice experiment

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  • Michel Kanmogne

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  • Kent Eskridge
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    Abstract

    Many small businesses fail before their fifth anniversary, with proportionally more minority owned businesses failing than others. The bulk of these failing entities is often organized in the form of sole proprietorship, while sound business partnerships could potentially be conducive to better prospective entrepreneurships. The objective of this study was to evaluate the importance of prospective partners’ characteristics, on the willingness of business respondents to become business partners. In the process, we used a confounded factorial conjoint choice experimental design. We found “Values sharing”, “Term orientation”, and “Community membership” to be among the most influential factors for the determination of entrepreneurial partnership. The effect direction of “shared-attributes” suggested a central need for complementary diversity in the process of sound business partnership formation. Respondents were more likely to partner with technically skilled prospective partners, than with managerially skilled ones. White respondents displayed more of a preference for business partners who did not share their values, compared to their Black counterparts. The confounded factorial conjoint choice experiment approach used in this study proved to be a helpful tool for investigating factors that influence sound business partnership formation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11135-011-9575-1
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Quality & Quantity.

    Volume (Year): 47 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 943-960

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:47:y:2013:i:2:p:943-960

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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    Related research

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business partnership; Business owners; Choice-set; Confounded-factorial; Decision-making;

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