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The influence of wages on parents’ allocations of time to child care and market work in the United Kingdom

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Author Info

  • Charlene Kalenkoski
  • David Ribar

    ()

  • Leslie Stratton

Abstract

We use time-diary data on couples with children from the 2000 United Kingdom Time Use Survey to examine the impacts of own and partner’s wages on parents’ provision of child care and market work on weekdays and on weekends and holidays. We find that increases in partners’ wages increase women’s primary care on all days and decrease their market work on weekdays, while increases in women’s own wages increase their market work on weekdays. In contrast, men’s time use is only responsive to their own wage on weekend days, when they reduce their market time and increase their primary child care time in response to higher wages.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-008-0192-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 22 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 399-419

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:22:y:2009:i:2:p:399-419

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Related research

Keywords: Time use; Child care; Wages; J1; J2;

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  1. Klevmarken, N. Anders, 2004. "Estimates of a Labour Supply Function Using Alternative Measures of Hours of Work," IZA Discussion Papers 1035, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Thomas Mroz, . "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 84-8, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  3. Martin Browning & P.A. Chiappori, 1996. "Efficient Intra-Household Allocations - A General Characterization and Empirical Tests," Discussion Papers 96-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  4. Kooreman, P. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1984. "A disaggregated analysis of the allocation of time within the household," Research Memorandum 153, Tilburg University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  5. Paul J. Devereux, 2004. "Changes in Relative Wages and Family Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
  6. Chiappori, P.A., 1989. "Collective Labour Supply and Welfare," DELTA Working Papers 89-07, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  7. Blundell, Richard & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Bivariate alternatives to the Tobit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 179-200.
  8. Hallberg, Daniel & Klevmarken, Anders, 2001. "Time for Children, a Study of Parents’ Time Allocation," Working Paper Series 2001:21, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  9. Richard Blundell & Thomas MaCurdy, 1998. "Labour supply: a review of alternative approaches," IFS Working Papers W98/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Charlene M. Kalenkoski & David C. Ribar & Leslie S. Stratton, 2005. "Parental Child Care in Single-Parent, Cohabiting, and Married-Couple Families: Time-Diary Evidence from the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 194-198, May.
  11. Suzanne Bianchi, 2000. "Maternal employment and time with children: Dramatic change or surprising continuity?," Demography, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 401-414, November.
  12. Robert A. Pollak, 2005. "Bargaining Power in Marriage: Earnings, Wage Rates and Household Production," NBER Working Papers 11239, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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