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Extremism within the family

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  • Gil Epstein

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Abstract

This paper considers an economic analysis of intergenerational transition of ethnic and social trait. We consider the level of social traits chosen by parents and its effect on their children's choice of ethnic and social traits when reaching adulthood. We develop a theory that suggests that parents will chose extreme ethnic and social traits in order to increase the cost that their children will pay if they wish to deviate from their parent's "ideal". The extreme choice of the ethnic social traits of parents has an effect on the segregation of minorities and migrants.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-006-0100-0
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 20 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 707-715

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:20:y:2007:i:3:p:707-715

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Related research

Keywords: Intergenerational transition; Social trait; Migrants; F22; J1; D1;

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References

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  1. Bergstrom, Theodore C, 1989. "A Fresh Look at the Rotten Kid Theorem--and Other Household Mysteries," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1138-59, October.
  2. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2005. "The melting pot and school choice," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 871-896, June.
  3. Mark Gradstein & Maurice Schiff, 2006. "The political economy of social exclusion, with implications for immigration policy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 327-344, June.
  4. Bisin, A. & Verdier, T., 1999. "Beyond the Melting Pot: Cultural Transmission, Marriage, and the Evolution of Ethnic and Religious Traits," Papers 1999-10, Laval - Laboratoire Econometrie.
  5. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2004. "Ethnic Networks and International Trade," IZA Discussion Papers 1232, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Glazer, A. & Konrad, K.A., 1995. "The Electoral Politics of Extreme Policies," Papers 94-95-23, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
  7. Hendrik JØrges, 2000. "Of rotten kids and Rawlsian parents: The optimal timing of intergenerational transfers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 147-157.
  8. Alberto Alesina & Eliana La Ferrara, 1999. "Participation in Heterogeneous Communities," NBER Working Papers 7155, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Edward P. Lazear, 1995. "Culture and Language," NBER Working Papers 5249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 0042, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. La Ferrara, Eliana & Alesina, Alberto, 2000. "Participation in Heterogeneous Communities," Scholarly Articles 4551796, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Gil S. Epstein, 2012. "Frontier Issues of the Political Economy of Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1224, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Gil S. Epstein, 2012. "Migrants, Ethnicity and the Welfare State," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1225, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Alberto Bisin & Thierry Verdier, 2010. "The Economics of Cultural Transmission and Socialization," NBER Working Papers 16512, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Fausto Galli & Giuseppe Russo, 2013. "Immigration Restriction and Long-Run Cultural Assimilation: Theory and Quasi-Experimental Evidence," CSEF Working Papers 349, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  5. Gil Epstein, 2009. "Willingness to Assimilate and Ethnicity," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 35, pages 1.

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