Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Age structure effects and growth in the OECD, 1950-1990

Contents:

Author Info

  • Thomas Lindh

    ()
    (Institute for Housing Research, Uppsala University, Box 785, SE-801 29 GÄvle, Sweden)

  • Bo Malmberg

    ()
    (Institute for Housing Research, Uppsala University, Box 785, SE-801 29 GÄvle, Sweden)

Abstract

Economic growth depends on human resources and human needs. The demographic age structure shapes both of these factors. We study five-year data from the OECD countries 1950-1990 in the framework of an age structure augmented neoclassical growth model with gradual technical adjustment. The model performs well in both pooled and panel estimations. The growth patterns of GDP per worker (labor productivity) in the OECD countries are to a large extent explained by age structure changes. The 50-64 age group has a positive influence, and the group above 65 contributes negatively, while younger age groups have ambiguous effects. However, the mechanism behind these age effects is not yet resolved.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/papers/9012003/90120431.pdf
Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 12 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 431-449

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:12:y:1999:i:3:p:431-449

Note: Received: 16 January 1997/Accepted: 2 July 1998
Contact details of provider:
Phone: +43-70-2468-8236
Fax: +43-70-2468-8238
Email:
Web page: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/index.htm
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://link.springer.de/orders.htm

Related research

Keywords: Growth · age structure · technology barriers · human capital;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. de la Croix, David & Lindh, Thomas & Malmberg, Bo, 2006. "Growth and Longevity from the Industrial Revolution to the Future of an Aging Society," Arbetsrapport 2006:9, Institute for Futures Studies.
  2. Alexia Prskawetz & Thomas Kögel & Warren C. Sanderson & Sergei Scherbov, 2009. "The Effects of Age Structure on Economic Growth: An Application of Probabilistic Forecasting in India," Working Papers 0403, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna.
  3. Luciano Fanti & Luca Gori, 2009. "On economic growth and minimum wages," Discussion Papers 2009/78, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
  4. Ciliberto, Federico & Miller, Amalia & Skyt Nielsen, Helena & Simonsen, Marianne, 2013. "Playing the Fertility Game at Work: An Equilibrium Model of Peer Effects," MPRA Paper 45914, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Francesco C. Billari & Guido Tabellini, 2010. "Italians Are Late: Does It Matter?," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 371-412 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Tomas Kögel, 2001. "Youth dependency and total factor productivity," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-030, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  7. Liu, Shenglong & Hu, Angang, 2013. "Demographic change and economic growth: Theory and evidence from China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 71-77.
  8. Bratti, Massimiliano & Conti, Chiara, 2014. "The Effect of (Mostly Unskilled) Immigration on the Innovation of Italian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Ilmakunnas, Pekka & Miyakoshi, Tatsuyoshi, 2013. "What are the drivers of TFP in the Aging Economy? Aging labor and ICT capital," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 201-211.
  10. Antonio Golini & Anna Di Bartolomeo, 2009. "The impact of a massive migration flow on the regional population structure: The case of Italy," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 7(1), pages 149-165.
  11. Stephan Brunow & Georg Hirte, 2006. "Age structure and regional economic growth," Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 3-23, March.
  12. Mahlberg, Bernhard & Freund, Inga & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2011. "Ageing, productivity and wages in Austria: Evidence from a matched employer-employee data set at the sector level," ECON WPS - Vienna University of Technology Working Papers in Economic Theory and Policy 02/2011, Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, Research Group Economics (ECON).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:12:y:1999:i:3:p:431-449. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn) or (Christopher F Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.