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Mobility where mobility is illegal: Internal migration and city growth in the Soviet Union

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Author Info

  • Ira N. Gang

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Rutgers University, 75 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1248, USA Fax: 932-7416; e-mail: gang@economics.rutgers.edu, stuart@economics.rutgers.edu))

  • Robert C. Stuart

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Rutgers University, 75 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1248, USA Fax: 932-7416; e-mail: gang@economics.rutgers.edu, stuart@economics.rutgers.edu))

Abstract

This paper examines an important anomaly in the internal migration history of the former Soviet Union (FSU). While many cities were closed in the sense of explicitly limiting growth of city population from migration, it was difficult to assess the effectiveness of these controls. We analyze a sample of 308 Soviet cities to isolate the impact of closure regulations controlling for city size. We find that while there are pervasive patterns of city growth, the rate increasing through the 1960s and declining thereafter, there are also pervasive differences between controlled and uncontrolled cities, the later growing significantly faster in almost all cases, controlling for city size.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 12 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 117-134

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:12:y:1999:i:1:p:117-134

Note: Received: 17 July 1997/Accepted: 16 March 1998
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Related research

Keywords: Cities · migration · urbanization;

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Cited by:
  1. Alexander Muravyev, 2006. "Human Capital Externalities: Evidence from the Transition Economy of Russia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 629, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Gang, Ira N & Stuart, Robert C, 2002. "The Political Economy of Russian City Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(3), pages 491-508, April.
  3. Gang, Ira N. & Stuart, Robert C., 2004. "Russian Cities in Transition: The Impact of Market Forces in the 1990s," IZA Discussion Papers 1151, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Mikhailova, Tatiana, 2012. "Gulag, WWII and the Long-run Patterns of Soviet City Growth," MPRA Paper 41758, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2011. "The impact of Chernobyl on health and labour market performance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 843-857.
  6. Yuri Andrienko & Sergei Guriev, 2003. "Determinants of Interregional Mobility in Russia: Evidence from Panel Data," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 551, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  7. Xavier Chojnicki & Ainura Uzagalieva, 2008. "Labor Migration from East to West in the Context of European Integration and Changing Socio-political Borders," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0366, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  8. World Bank, 2012. "In Search of Opportunities : How a More Mobile Workforce Can Propel Ukraine’s Prosperity (Vol. 2 of 2) : Technical Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12287, The World Bank.

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