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Would Socio-Economic Inequalities in Depression Fade Away with Income Transfers?

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  • Joan Costa-Font

    ()

  • Joan Gil

Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10902-008-9088-3
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Happiness Studies.

Volume (Year): 9 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 539-558

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:9:y:2008:i:4:p:539-558

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1389-4978

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Related research

Keywords: Depression; Income; Health inequities; Education and occupational status; Mental health; Spain;

References

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  1. Pilar García Gómez & Ángel López, 2004. "Socio-economic inequalities in health in Catalonia," Economics Working Papers 758, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2005.
  2. Karen Smith Conway & Lisa DeFelice Kennedy, 2004. "Maternal Depression and the Production of Infant Health," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(2), pages 260-286, October.
  3. Berndt, Ernst R. & Finkelstein, Stan N. & Greenberg, Paul E. & Howland, Robert H. & Keith, Alison & Rush, A. John & Russell, James & Keller, Martin B., 1998. "Workplace performance effects from chronic depression and its treatment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 511-535, October.
  4. Katharina Hauck & Nigel Rice, 2004. "A longitudinal analysis of mental health mobility in Britain," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(10), pages 981-1001.
  5. Ruth X. Liu & Zeng-yin Chen, 2006. "The Effects of Marital Conflict and Marital Disruption on Depressive Affect: A Comparison Between Women In and Out of Poverty," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 87(2), pages 250-271.
  6. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
  7. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
  8. Frank, Richard G. & McGuire, Thomas G., 2000. "Economics and mental health," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 893-954 Elsevier.
  9. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  10. Wagstaff, Adam & Van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2001. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2714, The World Bank.
  11. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2002. "How important is Methodology for the Estimates of the Determinants of Happiness?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-024/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  12. World Bank, 2003. "Mental Health," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9719, The World Bank.
  13. Wildman, John, 2003. "Income related inequalities in mental health in Great Britain: analysing the causes of health inequality over time," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 295-312, March.
  14. Kakwani, Nanak & Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 1997. "Socioeconomic inequalities in health: Measurement, computation, and statistical inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 87-103, March.
  15. Eddy van Doorslaer & Xander Koolman, 2004. "Explaining the differences in income-related health inequalities across European countries," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 609-628.
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Cited by:
  1. Morasae, Esmaeil Khedmati & Forouzan, Ameneh Setareh & Asadi-Lari, Mohsen & Majdzadeh, Reza, 2012. "Revealing mental health status in Iran's capital: Putting equity and efficiency together," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 531-537.
  2. Mario Yapu, 2011. "Diversificación del campo de la Educación Superior y las Universidades," Development Research Working Paper Series 02/2011, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
  3. Antonio Rodríguez & Rosemary L. Hopcroft & Yong-Hwan Noh, 2011. "Depressive mood and children: Europe and South Korea," Development Research Working Paper Series 03/2011, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.

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