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Balanced growth and structural breaks: evidence for Germany

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  • Niels Kemper

    ()

  • Dierk Herzer

    ()

  • Luca Zamparelli

    ()

Abstract

One of the central hypotheses of the neoclassical growth literature is the balanced- growth hypothesis, which predicts that output, consumption, and investment grow at the same rate. Empirically, this implies that the consumption-to-output ratio and the investment-to-output ratio must be stationary and that consumption and investment must be cointegrated with output. This paper tests these implications with respect to Germany, using unit root tests and cointegration techniques that allow for an endogenously determined structural break. We find that the long-run growth path of the German economy is consistent with the balanced-growth hypothesis if we allow for a structural break associated with the worldwide productivity slowdown of the early 1970s.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 409-424

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Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:40:y:2011:i:2:p:409-424

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Related research

Keywords: Balanced growth; Unit roots; Cointegration; Endogenous structural breaks; E23; E32; C32;

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References

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  1. Bent Nielsen, 2000. "Cointegration Analysis in the Presence of Structural Breaks in the Deterministic Trend," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1494, Econometric Society.
  2. Robert G. King & Charles I. Plosser & James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1992. "Stochastic Trends and Economic Fluctuations," NBER Working Papers 2229, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Jesus Clemente & Antonio Montanes & Montserrat Ponz, 1999. "Are the consumption/output and investment/output ratios stationary? An international analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(10), pages 687-691.
  10. Perron, Pierre & Vogelsang, Timothy J, 1992. "Nonstationarity and Level Shifts with an Application to Purchasing Power Parity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(3), pages 301-20, July.
  11. Hong Li & Vince Daly, 2009. "Testing the balanced growth hypothesis: evidence from China," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 185-200, September.
  12. David Harvey & Stephen Leybourne & Paul Newbold, 2003. "How great are the great ratios?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(2), pages 163-177.
  13. Gómez, Manuel A., 2008. "Dynamics Of The Saving Rate In The Neoclassical Growth Model With Ces Production," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(02), pages 195-210, April.
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