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Transport in regional science: The “death of distance” is premature

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Author Info

  • Piet Rietveld

    ()

  • Roger Vickerman

    ()

Abstract

Transport costs have always been an important dimension in regional science. It is therefore remarkable that regional science and transport economics have developed in a rather unconnected way. Although being distinct, the routes of the two were parallel, and there are signs that the two fields will get closer to each other. This paper further discusses long run trends in transport costs and the potential spatial consequences. The main conclusion is that although in terms of money and time, the performance of transport has improved enormously, many economic activities have not become footloose to the extent as expressed by the notion of ‘death of distance’. One of the reasons discussed is the role of transaction costs, some being clearly related with distance. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2003

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10110-003-0184-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Papers in Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 83 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 229-248

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Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:83:y:2003:i:1:p:229-248

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Web page: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/10101/index.htm

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Related research

Keywords: Regional science; transport cost; transaction costs; death of distance;

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Cited by:
  1. Hartmut Egger & Peter Egger, 2004. "Outsourcing and Trade in a Spatial World," CESifo Working Paper Series 1349, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Emmanouil Tranos & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "The Death Of Distance Revisited: Cyber-Place, Physical And Relational Proximities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 855-873, December.
  3. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00586878 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Vickerman, Roger, 2003. "Transport in an Integrating Europe: Sustainable Development and Cohesion," Investigaciones Regionales, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 3, pages 163-174.
  5. Verma, Ashish & Sudhira, H.S. & Rathi, Sujaya & King, Robin & Dash, Nibedita, 2013. "Sustainable urbanization using high speed rail (HSR) in Karnataka, India," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 67-77.
  6. Don J. Webber & Michael Horswell, 2009. "Microeconomic foundations of geographical variations in labour productivity," Working Papers 0913, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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