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Endogenous elites: power structure and patron-client relationships

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  • Petros Sekeris

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Abstract

In weak institutional settings, autocrats barter political and economic concessions for support to remain in power and extract rents. Instead of viewing the favors’ beneficiaries, i.e. the elites, as an exogenous entity, we allow the king to decide whom to coopt provided the subjects are heterogeneous in the potential support - their strength - they could bring to the regime. While the ruler can select the elites on the basis of their personal characteristics, an alternative strategy consists in introducing some uncertainty in the cooptation process. The latter strategy allows the king to reduce the clients’ cooptation price since in the event of a revolution the likelihood of being included in the future body of elites is lower. We show that weak rulers are more likely to coopt the society’s strongest individuals, while powerful rulers diversify the composition of their clientele. Moreover, when agents value more future discounted outcomes, the king is more likely to randomly coopt subjects. Weak institutions Autocracy Rent seeking Elites

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Economics of Governance.

Volume (Year): 12 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 237-258

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Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:12:y:2011:i:3:p:237-258

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Related research

Keywords: Weak institutions; Autocracy; Rent seeking; Elites;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Giacomo De Luca & Petros G. Sekeris & Juan F. Vargas, 2011. "Beyond divide and rule: weak dictators, natural resources and civil conflict," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 008893, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
  2. Giacomo De Luca & Anastasia Litina & Petros G. Sekeris, 2012. "Growth-Friendly Dictatorships," CREA Discussion Paper Series 12-13, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
  3. Platteau, Jean-Phillipe & Sekeris, Petros G., 2013. "Seduction of Religious Clerics and Violence in Autocratic Regimes - with special emphasis on Islam," NEPS Working Papers 3/2013, Network of European Peace Scientists.

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