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The gradient in sub-saharan Africa: Socioeconomic status and HIV/AIDS

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  • Jane Fortson

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0006
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 45 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 303-322

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:45:y:2008:i:2:p:303-322

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Anne Case & Christina Paxson & Joseph Ableidinger, 2004. "Orphans in Africa: Parental Death, Poverty and School Enrollment," Working Papers 256, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
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    Cited by:
    1. Isaac Kalonda-Kanyama, 2010. "Civil War, Sexual Violence and HIV Infections: Evidence from the Democratic Republic of the Congo," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 47-60.
    2. Louise Roos, 2013. "Modelling the impact of HIV/AIDS: A literature review," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-233, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    3. Given Mutinta & Jeff Gow & Gavin George & Kelvin Kunda & Katarina Ojteg, 2011. "The Influence of Socio-Economic Determinants on HIV Prevalence in South Africa," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 1, pages 96-106, November.
    4. Georges Reniers & Rania Tfaily, 2012. "Polygyny, Partnership Concurrency, and HIV Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 1075-1101, August.
    5. Judith Lammers & Sweder van Wijnbergen & Daan Willebrands, 2011. "Gender Differences, HIV Risk Perception and Condom Use," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-051/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    6. Loubiere, Sandrine & Boyer, Sylvie & Protopopescu, Camélia & Bonono, Cécile Renée & Abega, Séverin-Cécile & Spire, Bruno & Moatti, Jean-Paul, 2009. "Decentralization of HIV care in Cameroon: Increased access to antiretroviral treatment and associated persistent barriers," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(2-3), pages 165-173, October.
    7. Tom S. Vogl, 2012. "Education and Health in Developing Economies," Working Papers 1453, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    8. Samir KC & Harold Lentzner, 2010. "The effect of education on adult mortality and disability: a global perspective," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 8(1), pages 201-235.
    9. Adamopoulou, Effrosyni, 2013. "New facts on infidelity," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 458-462.
    10. Oster, Emily, 2012. "HIV and sexual behavior change: Why not Africa?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-49.
    11. World Bank, 2009. "Swaziland - HIV Prevention Response and Modes of Transmission Analysis," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3046, The World Bank.
    12. World Bank, 2009. "Lesotho - HIV Prevention Response and Modes of Transmission Analysis," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3045, The World Bank.
    13. Durevall, Dick & Lindskog, Annika, 2009. "Economic Inequality and HIV in Malawi," Working Papers in Economics 425, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 01 Jan 2010.
    14. Jane G. Fortson, 2009. "HIV/AIDS and Fertility," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(3), pages 170-94, July.

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