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Credit programs for the poor and reproductive behavior in low-income countries: Are the reported causal relationships the result of heterogeneity bias?

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Author Info

  • Mark Pin

    ()

  • Shahidur Khandker
  • Signe-Mary Mckernan
  • M. Latif

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2648131
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

Volume (Year): 36 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 1-21

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Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:36:y:1999:i:1:p:1-21

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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References

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  1. Marjorie B. McElroy, 1990. "The Empirical Content of Nash-Bargained Household Behavior," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 559-583.
  2. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1984. "Specific Experience, Household Structure and Intergenerational Transfers: Farm Family Land and Labor Arrangements in Developing Countries," Bulletins 8432, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Olivier Dagnelie & Philippe LeMay-Boucher, 2008. "Rosca Participation in Benin: a Commitment Issue," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 735.08, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  2. David S. Lee & Thomas Lemieux, 2009. "Regression Discontinuity Designs in Economics," NBER Working Papers 14723, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jonathan Morduch, 1999. "The Microfinance Promise," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1569-1614, December.
  4. Duvendack, Maren & Palmer-Jones, Richard, 2011. "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations: Re-investigating the Evidence from Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 27902, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Mangyo, Eiji, 2008. "The effect of water accessibility on child health in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1343-1356, September.
  6. Alam, Saad, 2012. "The Effect of Gender-Based Returns to Borrowing on Intra-Household Resource Allocation in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1164-1180.
  7. Duvendack, Maren & Palmer-Jones, Richard, 2011. "The microfinance of reproduction and the reproduction of microfinance: understanding the connections between microfinance, empowerment, contraception and fertility in Bangladesh in the 1990s," MPRA Paper 32384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Park, Albert & Ren, Changqing, 2001. "Microfinance with Chinese Characteristics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 39-62, January.
  9. Ashish Bajracharya & Sajeda Amin, 2013. "Microcredit and Domestic Violence in Bangladesh: An Exploration of Selection Bias Influences," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(5), pages 1819-1843, October.
  10. Nazia Mansoor, 2011. "Marriage payments and bargaining power of women in rural Bangladesh," Studies in Economics 1119, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  11. Erasmo Papagni, 2008. "The Long-run Effects of Household Liquidity Constraints and Taxation on Fertility, Education, Saving, and Growth," Discussion Papers 11_2008, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
  12. Nidhiya Menon, 2006. "Long-term benefits of membership in microfinance programmes," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 571-594.
  13. McKernan, Signe-Mary & Pitt, Mark M. & Moskowitz, David, 2005. "Use of the formal and informal financial sectors : does gender matter? empirical evidence from rural Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3491, The World Bank.
  14. Filoso, Valerio & Papagni, Erasmo, 2010. "Fertility Choice and Financial Development," MPRA Paper 25930, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Jaikishan Desai & Alessandro Tarozzi, 2011. "Microcredit, Family Planning Programs, and Contraceptive Behavior: Evidence From a Field Experiment in Ethiopia," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 749-782, May.
  16. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker & Omar Haider Chowdhury & Daniel L. Millimet, 1998. "Credit Programs for the Poor and the Nutritional Status of Children in Rural Bangladesh," Working Papers 98-4, Brown University, Department of Economics, revised 16 Jan 1998.

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