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Greenhouse gas taxes on animal food products: rationale, tax scheme and climate mitigation effects

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  • Stefan Wirsenius
  • Fredrik Hedenus

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  • Kristina Mohlin

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10584-010-9971-x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Climatic Change.

Volume (Year): 108 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (September)
Pages: 159-184

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Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:108:y:2011:i:1:p:159-184

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10584

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  1. Olivier Allais & Véronique Nichèle, 2007. "Capturing structural changes in French meat and fish demand over the period 1991--2002," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 34(4), pages 517-538, December.
  2. Burton, Michael & Young, Trevor, 1992. "The Structure of Changing Tastes for Meat and Fish in Great Britain," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 165-80.
  3. John P. Weyant, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, and Geoff J. Blanford, 2006. "Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-32.
  4. Karagiannis, G. & Katranidis, S. & Velentzas, K., 2000. "An error correction almost ideal demand system for meat in Greece," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(1), January.
  5. Robert H. Beach & Benjamin J. DeAngelo & Steven Rose & Changsheng Li & William Salas & Stephen J. DelGrosso, 2008. "Mitigation potential and costs for global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(2), pages 109-115, 03.
  6. Alain Carpentier & Hervé Guyomard, 2001. "Unconditional Elasticities in Two-Stage Demand Systems: An Approximate Solution," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(1), pages 222-229.
  7. Searchinger, Timothy & Heimlich, Ralph & Houghton, R. A. & Dong, Fengxia & Elobeid, Amani & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Yu, Hun-Hsiang, 2008. "Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change," Staff General Research Papers 12881, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. Iain Fraser & Imad A. Moosa, 2002. "Demand Estimation in the Presence of Stochastic Trend and Seasonality: The Case of Meat Demand in the United Kingdom," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(1), pages 83-89.
  9. Schmutzler, Armin & Goulder, Lawrence H., 1997. "The Choice between Emission Taxes and Output Taxes under Imperfect Monitoring," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 51-64, January.
  10. Karagiannis, G. & Katranidis, S. & Velentzas, K., 2000. "An error correction almost ideal demand system for meat in Greece," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 29-35, January.
  11. Fousekis, Panos & Revell, Brian J., 2000. "Meat Demand In The Uk: A Differential Approach," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
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Cited by:
  1. Chiara Lombardini & Leena Lankoski, 2013. "Forced Choice Restriction in Promoting Sustainable Food Consumption: Intended and Unintended Effects of the Mandatory Vegetarian Day in Helsinki Schools," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 159-178, June.
  2. Fredrik Hedenus & Stefan Wirsenius & Daniel Johansson, 2014. "The importance of reduced meat and dairy consumption for meeting stringent climate change targets," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 79-91, May.
  3. Stefan Hellstrand, 2013. "Animal production in a sustainable agriculture," Environment, Development and Sustainability, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 999-1036, August.
  4. Nigel Key & Gregoire Tallard, 2012. "Mitigating methane emissions from livestock: a global analysis of sectoral policies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 387-414, May.

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