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Naturally confused: consumers’ perceptions of all-natural and organic pork products

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Author Info

  • Katie Abrams

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  • Courtney Meyers
  • Tracy Irani
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    Abstract

    Consumers are bombarded with labels and claims that are intended to address their concerns about how food products are produced, processed, and regulated. Among those are the natural or all-natural claims and the certified organic label. In this study, two focus groups were conducted to explore consumers’ attitudes toward all-natural and organic pork and to gather their reactions to the USDA organic standards for meat, and the policy for natural claims. Results indicated that participants had positive associations with the terms “organic” and “all-natural” with exceptions regarding the trustworthiness of all-natural claims. Participants perceived the “no” labeling theme (no antibiotics, no hormones, no chemicals, etc.) often coupled with the all-natural label on pork products as identifying potential health and animal welfare risks. In response to the USDA standards and policies for labeling pork products as organic or all-natural, participants expressed confusion and had many unanswered questions. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10460-009-9234-5
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Agriculture and Human Values.

    Volume (Year): 27 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 365-374

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:27:y:2010:i:3:p:365-374

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10460

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    Related research

    Keywords: All natural; Consumer perceptions; Marketing claims; Organic label; Naturally raised; Pork; Risk perceptions;

    References

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    1. Roe, Brian & Teisl, Mario F., 2007. "Genetically modified food labeling: The impacts of message and messenger on consumer perceptions of labels and products," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 49-66, February.
    2. T. Robert Fetter & Julie A. Caswell, 2002. "Variation in Organic Standards Prior to the National Organic Program," Food Marketing Policy Center Research Reports 072, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
    3. Hwang, Yun Jae & Roe, Brian E. & Teisl, Mario F., 2005. "An Empirical Analysis of United States Consumers' Concerns about Eight Food Production and Processing Technologies," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19128, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Golan, Elise H. & Kuchler, Fred & Mitchell, Lorraine, 2000. "Economics Of Food Labeling," Agricultural Economics Reports 34069, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Julie A. Caswell & Eliza M. Mojduszka, 1996. "Using Informational Labeling to Influence the Market for Quality in Food Products," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1248-1253.
    6. Jennifer Grannis & Dawn D. Thilmany, 2002. "Marketing natural pork: An empirical analysis of consumers in the mountain region," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 475-489.
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    Cited by:
    1. Jayson Lusk, 2011. "The market for animal welfare," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 561-575, December.
    2. Marcia Barcellos & Klaus Grunert & Yanfeng Zhou & Wim Verbeke & F. Perez-Cueto & Athanasios Krystallis, 2013. "Consumer attitudes to different pig production systems: a study from mainland China," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 443-455, September.

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