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The Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Less-Educated Immigrant Flows into U.S. States

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  • Nicole B. Simpson

    ()
    (Department of Economics, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346, USA; corresponding author)

  • Chad Sparber

    ()
    (Department of Economics, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346, USA;)

Abstract

We use a gravity model of migration and alternative estimation strategies to analyze how income differentials affect the flow of immigrants into U.S. states using annual data from the American Community Survey. We add to existing literature by decomposing income differentials into short- and long-term components and by focusing on newly arrived less-educated immigrants between 2000 and 2009. Our sample is unique in that the vast majority of our observations take zero values. Models that include observations with zero-flow values find that recent male immigrants respond to differences in (short-term) GDP fluctuations between origin countries and U.S. states, and perhaps to (long-term) trend GDP differences as well. More specifically, GDP fluctuations pull less-educated male immigrants into certain U.S. states, whereas GDP trends push less-educated male immigrants out of their countries of origin. Effects for less-educated women are less robust, as GDP coefficients tend to be much smaller than for men.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.4284/0038-4038-2011.377
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 80 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages: 414-438

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:80:2:y:2013:p:414-438

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  1. Federico S. Mandelman & Andrei Zlate, 2010. "Immigration, remittances, and business cycles," Working Paper 2008-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  2. Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Lameli, Alfred & Sudekum, Jens, 2011. "Dialects, Cultural Identity, and Economic Exchange," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2011-01, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  3. Pavel Svaton & Thierry Warin, 2007. "European Migration: Welfare Migration or Economic Migration?," International Trade and Finance Association Conference Papers 1095, International Trade and Finance Association.
  4. Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2008. "Income Maximization and the Selection and Sorting of International Migrants," NBER Working Papers 13821, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Francesc Ortega & Giovanni Peri, 2009. "The Causes and Effects of International Migrations: Evidence from OECD Countries 1980-2005," NBER Working Papers 14833, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Bertoli, Simone & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2011. "Multilateral Resistance to Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 5958, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2003. "What Fundamentals Drive World Migration?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  8. Lewer, Joshua J. & Pacheco, Gail & Rossouw, Stephanié, 2009. "Do Non-Economic Quality of Life Factors Drive Immigration?," IZA Discussion Papers 4385, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Clark, Ximena & Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2004. "Explaining U.S. immigration, 1971-98," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3252, The World Bank.
  10. Pedersen, Peder J. & Pytlikova, Mariola & Smith, Nina, 2008. "Selection and network effects--Migration flows into OECD countries 1990-2000," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1160-1186, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Beine, M. & Bricongne,J-C. & Bourgeon, P., 2013. "Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration," Working papers 453, Banque de France.
  2. Bertoli, Simone & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2013. "Multilateral resistance to migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 79-100.

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