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People Playing Games: The Human Face of Experimental Economics

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  • Catherine C. Eckel

    (School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas)

Abstract

Experiments can be used not only to test theory but also to measure preferences and assess heterogeneity of behavior. I discuss the design of experimental measures of altruism and trust, as well as their uses in assessing how behavior varies across individuals, and across partners that a given individual might encounter. Experiments show that women are more altruistic than men. The appearance of a partner substantially impacts trust and trustworthiness, in part through the association of attractiveness and skin tone with expectations about a partner's behavior.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 73 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 840–857

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:73:4:y:2007:p:840-857

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Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
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Cited by:
  1. Björn Frank, 2009. "Clean Evidence on Face-to-Face: Why Experimental Economics is of Interest to Regional Economists," MAGKS Papers on Economics 200904, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  2. Tan, Jonathan H.W. & Vogel, Claudia, 2008. "Religion and trust: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 832-848, December.
  3. Sheryl Ball & Catherine Eckel & Maria Heracleous, 2010. "Risk aversion and physical prowess: Prediction, choice and bias," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 167-193, December.
  4. Bj�rn Frank & Johann Graf Lambsdorff & Fr�d�ric Boehm, 2011. "Gender and Corruption: Lessons from Laboratory Corruption Experiments," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 23(1), pages 59-71, February.
  5. Bin, Okmyung & Edwards, Bob, 2009. "Social capital and business giving to charity following a natural disaster: An empirical assessment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 601-607, August.
  6. Martha A. Starr, 2009. "The social economics of ethical consumption: Theoretical considerations and empirical evidence," Working Papers 2009-07, American University, Department of Economics.
  7. Juan Camilo Cárdenas & Rajiv Sethi, 2007. "Attitudes and attributes: a field experiment with public officials and transfer recipients In Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 006881, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

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