Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Economic Freedom and Migration Flows between U.S. States

Contents:

Author Info

  • Nathan J. Ashby

    (Department of Economics, West Virginia University)

Abstract

A modified gravity model is estimated using a cross section of data drawn from the U.S. Census Bureau survey of 2000 in order to analyze the impact of economic freedom on gross migration flows among the lower 48 states. Spatial econometric methods are utilized in order to capture spatial effects not detected by distance. In addition, the Economic Freedom of North America Index is decomposed to determine the individual impact of various policies. Results show that states with higher relative economic freedom experience greater migration inflow through its direct impact on income and employment growth. In aggregate, the findings indicate that individuals migrate toward states with relatively higher government consumption expenditures, relatively lower tax burdens, and states with more freedom with respect to labor decisions in the form of less restrictive minimum wages, less concentration of unions, and less dependence on public employment.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 73 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (January)
Pages: 677–697

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:73:3:y:2007:p:677-697

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Samuel Jones & Michael Stroup, 2013. "Economic freedom and the mispricing of single-state municipal bond closed-end funds," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 173-187, April.
  2. Kha Yen Prentice & Laszlo Konya & David Prentice, 2013. "Was the African American great migration delayed by outlawing emigrant agents?," CEH Discussion Papers 018, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Apergis, Nicholas & Dincer, Oguzhan C. & Payne, James E., 2012. "Live free or bribe: On the causal dynamics between economic freedom and corruption in U.S. states," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 215-226.
  4. Compton, Ryan A. & Giedeman, Daniel C. & Hoover, Gary A., 2011. "Panel evidence on economic freedom and growth in the United States," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 423-435, September.
  5. Nathan Ashby & Russell Sobel, 2008. "Income inequality and economic freedom in the U.S. states," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 329-346, March.
  6. Cebula, Richard, 2007. "Small Firm Size and Health Insurance: A Private Enterprise Perspective," MPRA Paper 50939, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Apr 2007.
  7. Daniel B. Klein, 2013. "The Ideological Migration of the Economics Laureates: Introduction and Overview," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(3), pages 218-239, September.
  8. Joshua Hall & David Yu, 2012. "Ranking the Economic Freedom of North America using dominetrics," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 1949-1961.
  9. Jerzy Michalek & Nana Zarnekow, 2012. "Application of the Rural Development Index to Analysis of Rural Regions in Poland and Slovakia," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 105(1), pages 1-37, January.
  10. Monastiriotis, Vassilis & Kaplanis, Ioannis, 2011. "Flexible employment and cross- regional adjustment," Working Papers 2072/179671, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  11. Cebula, Richard & Clark, Jeff, 2010. "Migration, Economic Freedom, and Personal Freedom: An Empirical Analysis," MPRA Paper 50957, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 20 Apr 2010.
  12. Libman, Alexander & Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten & Yadav, Gaurav, 2013. "Are human rights and economic well-being substitutes? The evidence from migration patterns across the Indian states," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 139-164.
  13. Watkins, Tate & Yandle, Bruce, 2010. "Can Freedom and Knowledge Economy Indexes Explain Go-Getter Migration Patterns?," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 40(2).
  14. Miriam Henseler & Joachim Plesch, 2009. "How Can Scholarship Institutions Foster the Return of Foreign Students?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 229(4), pages 382-409, August.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:73:3:y:2007:p:677-697. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laura Razzolini).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.