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NCAA Enforcement and Competitive Balance in College Football

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Author Info

  • Craig A. Depken II

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Texas–Arlington)

  • Dennis P. Wilson

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Texas–Arlington, Arlington)

Abstract

This article investigates the effects of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) enforcement on the competitive balance of major college football conferences in the context of the standard empirical crime model. Using an unbalanced panel describing 11 major Division IA football conferences from 1953 through 2003, NCAA enforcement efforts, in the form of investigations and probations, and the severity of punishment, measured as the average length of probations imposed, are found to have opposite but not necessarily offsetting effects on competitive balance. Greater levels of enforcement in a conference improve competitive balance. On the other hand, greater severity of punishment reduces competitive balance. The empirical evidence indicates that these changes take approximately five years to be fully dissipated. Overall, the empirical results indicate that, on average, the net effect of NCAA enforcement is an improvement in competitive balance.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 72 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 826–845

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:72:4:y:2006:p:826-845

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Cited by:
  1. Pincin, Jared & Hoffer, Adam, 2013. "NCAA Athletic Departments: An Empirical Investigation of the Effects of Revenue and Conference Changes," MPRA Paper 49807, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Jaret Treber & Rachel Levy & Victor Matheson, 2011. "Gender Differences in Competitive Balance in Intercollegiate Basketball," Working Papers 1106, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  3. Yvan J. Kelly, 2008. "Cost Reduction, Competitive Balance, and the Scheduling of Back-to-Back Games in the NBA," Working Papers 0810, International Association of Sports Economists & North American Association of Sports Economists.
  4. Humphreys, Brad & Ruseski, Jane, 2009. "Tit-for-tat Strategies in Repeated Prisoner's Dilemma Games: Evidence from NCAA Football," Working Papers 2009-24, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  5. Pelnar, Gregory, 2007. "Antitrust Analysis of Sports Leagues," MPRA Paper 5382, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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