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The Effects of Maternity Leave Legislation on Mothers' Labor Supply after Childbirth

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  • Charles L. Baum II

    ()
    (Middle Tennessee State University)

Abstract

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, 12 states and the District of Columbia passed maternity leave legislation (MLL) allowing mothers a period of leave from work after childbirth. In 1993, President Clinton signed the first piece of federal MLL, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Similar to state legislation, the FMLA guarantees 12 weeks of unpaid leave for eligible mothers. I evaluate the effect of MLL on the incidence of leave taking, the probability that mothers will eventually return to work at their prechildbirth jobs, and the timing of their return. The results indicate that the legislation increases the number of mothers who eventually return to their prechildbirth jobs but that MLL does not have a statistically significant effect on the incidence of leave taking. The results also indicate that MLL allows mothers to delay their return to work at their prechildbirth jobs.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 69 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 772-799

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:69:4:y:2003:p:772-799

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Cited by:
  1. Charles L. Baum, 2004. "The Effect of Government-Mandated Family Leave on Employer Family Leave Policies," Working Papers, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance 200407, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
  2. Wen-Jui, Han & Ruhm, Christopher J. & Waldfogel, Jane, 2007. "Parental Leave Policies and Parents’ Employment and Leave-Taking," IZA Discussion Papers 3244, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Jonathan F. Pingle, 2003. "What if welfare had no work requirements? the age of youngest child exemption and the rise in employment of single mothers," Finance and Economics Discussion Series, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) 2003-57, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Rafael Lalive & Analía Schlosser & Andreas Steinhauer & Josef Zweimüller, 2011. "Parental leave and mothers' careers: the relative importance of job protection and cash benefits," ECON - Working Papers, Department of Economics - University of Zurich 042, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  5. Whitney Schott, 2012. "Going Back Part-time: Family Leave Legislation and Women’s Return to Work," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 1-30, February.
  6. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2008. "Accommodating Families," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics 2008-004, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  7. José Molina & Víctor Montuenga, 2009. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 237-251, September.
  8. Li Ma, 2014. "Economic crisis and women’s labor force return after childbirth: Evidence from South Korea," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(18), pages 511-552, August.
  9. Barbara Hanel, 2012. "The Impact of Paid Maternity Leave on Labour Market Outcomes," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne wp2012n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  10. Michael Baker & Kevin Milligan, 2005. "How Does Job-Protected Maternity Leave Affect Mothers' Employment and Infant Health?," NBER Working Papers 11135, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Schönberg, Uta & Ludsteck, Johannes, 2007. "Maternity Leave Legislation, Female Labor Supply, and the Family Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 2699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. José Alberto Molina & Víctor M. Montuenga, 2008. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty in a Mediterranean Country: The Case of Spain," Documentos de Trabajo, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza dt2008-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.

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