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Population Growth and Economic Growth: Long-Run Evidence from Latin America

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  • John Thornton

    ()
    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

Unit root tests, the Johansen maximal likelihood methodology, and Granger causality tests in the context of a one-step error correction model are used to examine the long-run relation between population and per capita GDP in seven Latin American countries over most of the 20th century. The results suggest that no long-run relation has existed and, hence, population growth neither causes per capita GDP growth nor is caused by it.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 68 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages: 464-468

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:68:2:y:2001:p:464-468

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Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
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Cited by:
  1. Fumitaka Furuoka & Qaiser Munir, 2011. "Population growth and standard of living: A threshold regression approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 844-859.
  2. Tsangyao Chang & Hsiao-Ping Chu & Frederick W. Deale & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "The Relationship between Population Growth and Economic Growth Over 1870-2013: Evidence from a Bootstrapped Panel-Granger Causality Test," Working Papers, Department of Research, Ipag Business School 2014-477, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
  3. Hasan, Mohammad S., 2010. "The long-run relationship between population and per capita income growth in China," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 355-372, May.
  4. Thomas Gries & Wim Naudé, 2010. "Entrepreneurship and structural economic transformation," Small Business Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 13-29, January.
  5. Fumitaka Furuoka, 2009. "Population Growth and Economic Development: New Empirical Evidence from Thailand," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(1), pages 1-14.
  6. Joao Ricardo Faria & Miguel Leon-Ledesma & Adolfo Sachsida, 2006. "Population and income: Is there a puzzle?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(6), pages 909-917.
  7. Dutt, Amitava K. & Ros, Jaime, 2007. "Aggregate demand shocks and economic growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 75-99, March.
  8. Ira Horowitz, 2007. "If you play well they will come-and vice versa: bidirectional causality in major-league baseball," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 93-105.

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