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Is Democracy a Normal Good? Evidence from Democratic Movements

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  • Jenny A. Minier

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Miami)

Abstract

A frequent assertion of economists and political scientists is that democracy is a normal good, or that higher incomes lead citizens to “desire” more democracy. This assertion, however, has been difficult to test directly. I introduce a data set of democratic movements, and use it to address the relationship between income and the demand for democracy. Logit analysis of the estimated probability that a democratic movement occurs in an authoritarian country suggests that this probability is increasing in income per capita up to a level of approximately $5000. Unlike previous results, this does not suggest that all countries will become democratic once they pass some income threshold.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 67 (2001)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 996-1009

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:67:4:y:2001:p:996-1009

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Cited by:
  1. Thomas Apolte, . "Democracy and Prosperity in two Decades of Transition," Working Papers 200106, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.
  2. Pauline Grosjean & Claudia Senik, 2007. "Should market liberalization precede democracy? Causal relations between political preferences and development," PSE Working Papers halshs-00588060, HAL.
  3. Tang, Sam Hak Kan & Yung, Linda Chor Wing, 2008. "Does rapid economic growth enhance democratization? Time-series evidence from high performing Asian economies," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 244-253, June.
  4. Duha Altindag & Naci Mocan, 2010. "Joblessness and Perceptions about the Effectiveness of Democracy," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1016, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  5. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00588060 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Pauline Grosjean & Claudia Senik, 2011. "Democracy, Market Liberalization, and Political Preferences," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 365-381, February.
  7. Apolte, Thomas, 2013. "The supply of democracy explaining voluntary democratic transition," CIW Discussion Papers 6/2013, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
  8. Alexander Libman, 2012. "Democracy and Growth: Is The Effect Non-Linear?," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 2(1), pages 99-120, May.
  9. Libman, Alexander & Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten & Yadav, Gaurav, 2013. "Are human rights and economic well-being substitutes? The evidence from migration patterns across the Indian states," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 139-164.
  10. Apolte, Thomas & Peters, Heiko, 2009. "Governance, Demokratie und wirtschaftliche Entwicklung in den ehemals sozialistischen Staaten," IÖB-Diskussionspapiere 1/09, University of Münster, Institute for Economic Education.
  11. Burke, Paul J. & Leigh, Andrew, 2010. "Do Output Contractions Trigger Democratic Change?," IZA Discussion Papers 4808, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Möller, Marie, 2011. "Economic voting and economic revolutionizing? The economics of incumbency changes in European democracies and revolutionary events in the Arab World," CIW Discussion Papers 10/2011, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
  13. Linda Chor Wing Yung & Sam Hak-Kan Tang, 2005. "Does Rapid Economic Growth Accelerate Democratization? Time-Series Evidence from High Performing Asian Economies," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 05-20, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.

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