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Beer Taxation and Alcohol-Related Traffic Fatalities

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Author Info

  • Brent D. Mast
  • Bruce L. Benson
  • David W. Rasmussen

Abstract

Most studies of alcohol-related traffic fatalities find beer taxes to be an important policy variable. This is surprising since beer taxes only have a small impact on consumption and heavy drinkers are the least responsive to prices. This study shows that the tax relationship is not robust across data periods and that it reflects missing variable biases. While lack of control for law enforcement effort does not appear to bias tax coefficients, failure to include determinants of alcohol consumption other than taxes and drinking age and/or factors that simultaneously determine drinking behavior and political support for alcohol taxes apparently do.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 66 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (October)
Pages: 214-249

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:66:2:y:1999:p:214-249

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Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Albalate, 2006. "Lowering blood alcohol content levels to save lives: The european experience," Working Papers, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP) CREAP20006-07, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Dec 2006.
  2. Young, Douglas J. & Likens, Thomas W., 2000. "Alcohol Regulation and Auto Fatalities," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 107-126, March.
  3. Beth A. Freeborn & Brian McManus, 2007. "Substance Abuse Treatment and Motor Vehicle Fatalities," Working Papers, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary 66, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  4. French, Michael T. & Gumus, Gulcin & Homer, Jenny F., 2009. "Public policies and motorcycle safety," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 831-838, July.
  5. Daniel Albalate, 2007. "Lowering blood alcohol content levels to save lives: A European case study," Working Papers in Economics, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia 173, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
  6. Nejat Anbarci & Monica Escaleras & Charles Register, 2005. "Income, Income Inequality and the “Hidden Epidemic” of Traffic Fatalities," Working Papers, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University 05002, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University, revised Aug 2006.
  7. Martin Binder, 2014. "Should evolutionary economists embrace libertarian paternalism?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 515-539, July.
  8. José Mª Arranz & Ana I. Gil, 2008. "Alcoholic beverages as determinants of traffic fatalities," Alcamentos, Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Economía. 0803, Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Economía..
  9. David C. Grabowski & Michael A. Morrisey, 2004. "Gasoline prices and motor vehicle fatalities," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(3), pages 575-593.
  10. Mark Paul Gius, 2003. "Using Nlsy-Geocode Data To Determine The Effects Of Taxes And Minimum Age Laws On The Alcoholic Beverage Demand Of Young Adults," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 34(1), pages 38-50.
  11. Philip J. Cook & Michael J. Moore, 2001. "Environment and Persistence in Youthful Drinking Patterns," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 375-438 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Chong Son & Kudret Topyan, 2011. "The effect of alcoholic beverage excise tax on alcohol-attributable injury mortalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 103-113, April.
  13. Jon Nelson, 2008. "How Similar are Youth and Adult Alcohol Behaviors? Panel Results for Excise Taxes and Outlet Density," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(1), pages 89-104, March.
  14. Omura, Makiko, 2014. "The Effects of Tax Policy on Alcoholic Beverage Trends and Alcohol Demand in Japan," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France, Agricultural Economics Society 170487, Agricultural Economics Society.
  15. Paul Zimmerman, 2004. "A Theoretical Analysis of Alcohol Regulation and Drinking-Related Economic Crime," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 169-190, September.
  16. Thomas S. Dee & William N. Evans, 2001. "Teens and Traffic Safety," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 121-166 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Jon P. Nelson, 2013. "Does Heavy Drinking by Adults Respond to Higher Alcohol Prices and Taxes? A Survey and Assessment," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 43(3), pages 265-291, December.
  18. Lovenheim, Michael F. & Slemrod, Joel, 2010. "The fatal toll of driving to drink: The effect of minimum legal drinking age evasion on traffic fatalities," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 62-77, January.
  19. Daniel Albalate, 2008. "Lowering blood alcohol content levels to save lives: The European experience," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 20-39.
  20. Carpenter, Christopher, 2005. "Youth alcohol use and risky sexual behavior: evidence from underage drunk driving laws," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 613-628, May.
  21. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Alcohol abuse and economic conditions: Evidence from repeated cross-sections of individual-level data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(3), pages 257-270.
  22. Thomas S Dee, 2001. "Does setting limits save lives? The case of 0.08 BAC laws," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 111-128.
  23. Liang, Lan & Sloan, Frank A. & Stout, Emily M., 2004. "Precaution, compensation, and threats of sanction: the case of alcohol servers," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 49-69, March.

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