Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

On-the-Job Training, Establishment Size, and Firm Size: Evidence for Economies of Scale in the Production of Human Capital

Contents:

Author Info

  • Dan A. Black
  • Brett J. Noel
  • Zheng Wang

Abstract

Oi argues that the costs of monitoring employees rise with the value of the entrepreneur’s time. One way of economizing on these monitoring costs is through the provision of on-the-job training for new employees. In this paper, we argue that differences in training by firm- and establishment-size arise from cost advantages for larger firms; specifically, large firms and establishments have economies of scale in the provision of formal training and greater opportunities for informal coworker training. A unique data set is employed to estimate the relation among employer size and the intensity, duration, and composition of various training measures. It is possible that these cost advantages, which lead to greater amounts of training for employees of large firms, may explain, in part, the wage rate–firm size differential.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 66 (1999)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 82-100

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:66:1:y:1999:p:82-100

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Guidetti, Giovanni & Mazzanti, Massimiliano, 2007. "Firm-level training in local economic systems: Complementarities in production and firm innovation strategies," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 875-894, December.
  2. Thierry Lallemand & François Rycx, 2007. "Employer size and the structure of wages: a critical survey," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/8747, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. Thierry Lallemand & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2007. "The establishment-size wage premium: evidence from European countries," Empirica, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 427-451, December.
  4. Paige Ouimet & Rebecca Zarutskie, 2011. "Acquiring Labor," Working Papers 11-32, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  5. Oluyemisi Kuku & Orazem, Peter & Sawkut Rojid & Vodopivec, Milan, 2012. "Do Training Funds Raise the Pace of Training? The Case of Mauritius," Staff General Research Papers 35729, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Emilia Del Bono & Daniela Vuri, 2008. "Job Mobility and the Gender Wage Gap in Italy," CEIS Research Paper 130, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 06 Nov 2008.
  7. Diez-Vial, Isabel, 2011. "Geographical cluster and performance: The case of Iberian ham," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 517-525, August.
  8. Massimo Caruso, 2006. "Monetary Policy Impulses, Local Output and the Transmission Mechanism," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 65(1), pages 1-30, May.
  9. Gander, James P., 2003. "Technology adoption and labor training under uncertainty," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 285-289, June.
  10. Lixin Cai & C. Jeffrey Waddoups, 2009. "The Role of Unobserved Heterogeneity and On-the-Job Training in the Employer Size-Wage Effect: Evidence from Australia," Working Papers 0915, University of Nevada, Las Vegas , Department of Economics.
  11. Massimo Caruso, 2004. "Monetary Policy Impulses, Local Output and the Transmission Mechanism," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 537, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  12. James Zuccollo & Sholeh Maani & Bill Kaye-Blake & Lulu Zeng, 2013. "Private Returns to Tertiary Education - How Does New Zealand Compare to the OECD?," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/10, New Zealand Treasury.
  13. Carlos Peraita, 2001. "Firm Sponsored Training In Regulated Labor Markets: Evidence From Spain," Working Papers. Serie EC 2001-15, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  14. C. Waddoups, 2011. "Firm Size and Work-Related Training: New Evidence on Incidence, Intensity, and Training Type from Australia," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 390-413, December.
  15. Floreani, Vincent Arthur, 2014. "Fixing Europe's youth unemployment and skills mismatch, can public financial support to SMEs be effective? The case of the European Commission and European Investment Bank joint initiatives," MPRA Paper 55849, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Yanick Labrie & Claude Montmarquette, 2005. "La formation qualifiante et transférable en milieu de travail," CIRANO Project Reports 2005rp-04, CIRANO.
  17. Malo, Stéphane, 2009. "The contribution of (not so) public research to commercial innovations in the field of combinatorial chemistry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 957-970, July.
  18. Song, Younghwan, 2007. "Recall bias in the displaced workers survey: Are layoffs really lemons?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 335-345, June.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:66:1:y:1999:p:82-100. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laura Razzolini).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.