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Broadcast Advertising and U.S. Demand for Alcoholic Beverages

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  • Jon P. Nelson

Abstract

Quarterly data for 1977–1994 on alcohol consumption and advertising are used to estimate a differential demand system, including explanatory variables for broadcast advertising and print advertising. The model explains the growth rate of per capita consumption dependent on explanatory variables for prices, real income, demographic changes, and real advertising by media and beverage. Empirical results also are reported for total consumption of pure alcohol. The results for the three beverages and total alcohol indicate that advertising has little or no effect on demand. The empirical evidence thus supports the notion that regardless of media, advertising affects mainly brand shares.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 65 (1999)
Issue (Month): 4 (April)
Pages: 774-790

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:65:4:y:1999:p:774-790

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Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
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Cited by:
  1. Henry Saffer & Dhaval Dave, 2006. "Alcohol advertising and alcohol consumption by adolescents," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(6), pages 617-637.
  2. Nelson, Jon P., 2001. "Alcohol Advertising and Advertising Bans: A Survey of Research Methods, Results, and Policy Implications," Working Papers 7-01-2, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Jeffrey D. Kubik & John R. Moran, 2001. "Can Policy Changes Be Treated as Natural Experiments? Evidence from State Excise Taxes," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 39, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  4. Saroja Selvanathan & Eliyathamby Selvanathan, 2007. "Another look at the identical tastes hypothesis on the analysis of cross-country alcohol data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 185-215, April.
  5. Gallet, Craig A., 2007. "The demand for alcohol: a meta-analysis of elasticities," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(2), June.
  6. Thompson, Stanley R. & Sam, Abdoul G., 2008. "Country of Origin Advertising and U.S. Wine Imports," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6553, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. Christian Rojas & Everett B. Peterson, 2005. "Estimating Demand for Differentiated Products: The Case of Beer in the U.S," Food Marketing Policy Center Research Reports 089, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
  8. Dyack, Brenda & Goddard, Ellen W., 2001. "The Rise of Red and the Wane of White: Wine Demand in Ontario Canada," 2001 Conference (45th), January 23-25, 2001, Adelaide 125617, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  9. Rojas, Christian & Peterson, Everett B., 2008. "Demand for differentiated products: Price and advertising evidence from the U.S. beer market," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 288-307, January.
  10. Henry Saffer, 2000. "Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Advertising Bans," NBER Working Papers 7758, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Nelson, Jon P. & Young, Douglas J., 2001. "Do Advertising Bans Work? An International Comparison," Working Papers 6-01-1, Pennsylvania State University, Department of Economics.
  12. Duffy, Martyn, 2003. "On the estimation of an advertising-augmented, cointegrating demand system," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 181-206, January.
  13. Jon Nelson, 2003. "Advertising Bans, Monopoly, and Alcohol Demand: Testing for Substitution Effects using State Panel Data," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 1-25, February.
  14. Hamilton, Stephen F., 2009. "Informative advertising in differentiated oligopoly markets," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 60-69, January.
  15. Tanja Greiner & Marco Sahm, 2011. "How Effective are Advertising Bans? On the Demand for Quality in Two-Sided Media Markets," CESifo Working Paper Series 3524, CESifo Group Munich.

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