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Teaching Economics with Classroom Experiments: A Symposium

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  • Charles A. Holt

Abstract

Classroom experiments are effective because students are placed directly into the economic environments being studied. The papers in this special section span diverse applications, for example, speculation and multiple markets, coordination and voting games, and a simple macroeconomy. All experiments can be run with simple props, such as ordinary playing cards. After participating, students bring firsthand experience to the discussion to enhance the effectiveness of the Socratic method. In small classes, these exercises also enable bright undergraduates to run the experiments on their own classmates and to lead the ensuing discussions, creating a special teaching/learning environment.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Economic Association in its journal Southern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 65 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (January)
Pages: 603-610

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Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:65:3:y:1999:p:603-610

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Web page: http://www.southerneconomic.org/
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Cited by:
  1. Juan Luis Jiménez & Jordi Perdiguero & Ancor Suárez, 2011. "Debating as a classroom tool for adapting learning outcomes to the European higher education area," IREA Working Papers, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics 201109, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2011.
  2. Gerald Eisenkopf & Pascal Sulser, 2013. "How to Improve Economic Understanding? Testing Classroom Experiments in High Schools," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2013-04, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  3. Jamie Brown Kruse & Ozlem Ozdemir & Mark A. Thompson, 2005. "Market Forces and Price Ceilings: A Classroom Experiment," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 4(2), pages 73-86.
  4. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 2003. "Pluralism in Economics: A Public Good or a Public Bad?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 03-034/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 May 2004.
  5. Cebula, Richard & Toma, Michael, 2000. "The Effect of Classroom Games on Student Learning and Instructor Evaluations," MPRA Paper 55404, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Inhyuck "Steve" Ha & Jessica Hollars Wisniewski, 2011. "Experiential Learning Based Discussion vs. Lecture Based Discussion: How to Estimate the Unemployment Rate," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 11(1), pages 33-38, Summer.
  7. Mitchell, David & Hunsader, Kenneth & Parker, Scott, 2011. "A Futures Trading Experiment: An Active Classroom Approach to Learning," MPRA Paper 56496, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.
  8. Ming Fai Pang & Cedric Linder & Duncan Fraser, 2006. "Beyond Lesson Studies and Design Experiments: Using theoretical tools in practice and finding out how they work," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 5(1), pages 28-45.
  9. Dickinson, David L., 2009. "Experiment timing and preferences for fairness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 89-95, January.
  10. Don J. Webber & Andrew Mearman, 2009. "Students’ perceptions of economics:Identifying demand for further study," Working Papers 0914, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  11. Mousavi, Shabnam & Kheirandish, Reza, 2014. "Behind and beyond a shared definition of ecological rationality: A functional view of heuristics," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 67(8), pages 1780-1785.
  12. Mitchell, David & Rebelein, Robert P. & Schneider, Patricia & Simpson, Nicole B. & Eric Fisher, . "A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series, Vassar College Department of Economics 87, Vassar College Department of Economics.
  13. Jongeneel, Roelof A. & Koning, Niek, 2005. "Teaching Agricultural Policy Using Games: The Agripol Game," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark, European Association of Agricultural Economists 24773, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  14. Hendrik P. van Dalen, 2003. "Pluralism in Economics: A Public Good or a Public Bad?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 03-034/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 18 May 2004.
  15. Alberto Isgut & Ganesan Ravishanker & Tanya Rosenblat, 2005. "The Basics of International Trade: A Classroom Experiment," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics 2005-013, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
  16. Inhyuck "Steve" Ha & Jessica Hollars Wisniewski, 2011. "Experiential Learning Based Discussion vs. Lecture Based Discussion: How to Estimate the Unemployment Rate," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center, vol. 11(2), pages 33-38, Fall.
  17. Martin Shubik, 2001. "The Uses of Teaching Games in Game Theory Classes and Some Experimental Games," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University 1289, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  18. David L. Dickinson, 2006. "Cash or Credit? The importance of reward medium and experiment timing in classroom preferences for fairness," Working Papers, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University 06-12, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  19. Chris Geller, 2006. "Insecure Participation: Experiments in a One-Day Introduction to Economics, with Revised Experiments and Exercises," Economics Series 2006_32, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.

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