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Immigrant Performance and Selective Immigration Policy: A European Perspective

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  • Amelie Constant

    (IZA, Bonn)

  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

    (Bonn University, IZA Bonn and DIW Berlin, Zimmermann@iza.org)

Abstract

The European Union aims at a stronger participation by its population in work to foster growth and welfare. There are concerns about the attachment of immigrants to the labour force, and discussions about the necessary policy responses. Integrated labour and migration policies are needed. The employment chances of the low-skilled are limited. Whereas Europe could benefit from a substantive immigration policy that imposes selection criteria that are more in line with economic needs, the substantial immigration into the European Union follows largely non-economic motives. This paper discusses the economic rationale of a selective immigration policy and provides empirical evidence about the adverse effects of current selection mechanisms.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by National Institute of Economic and Social Research in its journal National Institute Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 194 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 94-105

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Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:194:y:2005:i:1:p:94-105

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Keywords: Migration policy; ethnicity; migrant workers; asylum seekers; family reunification;

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References

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  1. Veall, Michael R & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1994. "Goodness of Fit Measures in the Tobit Model," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 56(4), pages 485-99, November.
  2. Bauer, Thomas & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1995. "Integrating the East: The Labour Market Effects of Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 1235, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
  5. Boeri, Tito & Hanson, Gordon H. & McCormick, Barry (ed.), 2002. "Immigration Policy and the Welfare System: A Report for the Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199256310, September.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Münz, Rainer, 2007. "Migration, labor markets, and integration of migrants: An overview for Europe," HWWI Policy Papers 3-6, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  2. Korpi, Tomas, 2012. "Importing skills Migration policy, generic skills and earnings among immigrants in Australasia, Europe and North America," Working Paper Series 5/2012, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  3. Euwals, Rob & Dagevos, Jaco & Gijsberts, Mérove & Roodenburg, Hans, 2007. "The Labour Market Position of Turkish Immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands: Reason for Migration, Naturalisation and Language Proficiency," IZA Discussion Papers 2683, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Sébastien Jean & Orsetta Causa & Miguel Jimenez & Isabelle Wanner, 2010. "Migration and labour market outcomes in OECD countries," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2010(1), pages 1-34.
  5. Gil S. Epstein, 2012. "Migrants, Ethnicity and the Welfare State," Working Papers 2012-12, Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University.
  6. Zaiceva, Anzelika & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 2008. "Scale, Diversity and Determinants of Labour Migration in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 6921, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Aydemir, Abdurrahman, 2010. "Immigrant Selection and Short-Term Labour Market Outcomes by Visa Category," IZA Discussion Papers 4966, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Aydemir, Abdurrahman, 2012. "Skill Based Immigrant Selection and Labor Market Outcomes by Visa Category," IZA Discussion Papers 6433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Gil Epstein, 2009. "Willingness to Assimilate and Ethnicity," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 35, pages 1.
  10. Rob Euwals & Hans Roodenburg & J. Dagevos & M. Gijsberts, 2007. "The labour market position of Turkish immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands; reason for migration, naturalisation and language proficiency," CPB Discussion Paper 79, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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