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The Impact of Skilled Migration on the Sending Country: Evidence from African Medical Brain Drain

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  • Lucia Rizzica

    ()
    ("Luigi Bocconi" University of Milan)

Abstract

This paper examines how Medical Brain Drain (MBD) creates incentives for the production of doctors in the sending country (brain gain) and its effects on the health status of the local population. Using Bharghava-Docquier dataset I find no relation between MBD and rates of enrolment to medical schools in the country of origin while there are incentives to pursue secondary school in the sending country and tertiary education abroad. Finally MBD induces an increase in the number of deaths due to HIV/AIDS: a case-study reveals that MBD affects more the “quality” of health services rather than their “quantity”.

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File URL: http://www.rivistapoliticaeconomica.it/2008/nov-dic/pdf/Rizzica_en.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): 98 (2008)
Issue (Month): 6 (November-December)
Pages: 195-230

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:98:y:2008:i:6:p:195-230

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Related research

Keywords: brain drain; migration; human capital;

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  1. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2001. "Inducing Human Capital Formation: Migration as a Substitute for Subsidies," Economics Series 100, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  2. Frederic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2007. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0710, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Schiff, Maurice, 2005. "Brain Gain: Claims about Its Size and Impact on Welfare and Growth Are Greatly Exaggerated," IZA Discussion Papers 1599, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
  5. Michael Clemens, 2007. "Do Visas Kill? Health Effects of African Health Professional Emigration," Working Papers 114, Center for Global Development.
  6. Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers 95, Center for Global Development.
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