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I divari regionali in Italia sulla base degli indicatori sociali (1871-2001)

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  • Emanuele Felice

    ()
    (Università degli Studi di Bologna)

Abstract

This work presents and discusses some of the most important social indicators (height, education, life expectancy and human development index), referring to the Italian regions for the period spanning from 1871 to 2001. According to the data, there was a catching-up process of Southern Italy toward the Centre North, which started by the end of the XIXth century and came to a halt only in the last decades of the XXth century. In order to explain this trend, it is argued that the most backward regions have “passively” benefited from the improvements in social fields, such as nutrition, education and longevity, which spread through almost the whole world during this period.

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File URL: http://www.rivistapoliticaeconomica.it/2007/mar-apr/Eman_felice.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): 97 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (March-April)
Pages: 359-406

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:97:y:2007:i:2:p:359-406

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  1. Fenoaltea, Stefano, 2003. "Peeking Backward: Regional Aspects of Industrial Growth in Post-Unification Italy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(04), pages 1059-1102, December.
  2. repec:cup:jechis:v:63:y:2004:i:04:p:1059-1102_00 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Easterlin, Richard A., 1981. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(01), pages 1-17, March.
  4. Kakwani, N., 1993. "Performance in living standards : An international comparison," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 307-336, August.
  5. Crafts, N. F. R., 1997. "The Human Development Index and changes in standards of living: Some historical comparisons," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 299-322, December.
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Cited by:
  1. L. Mauro & F. Pigliaru, 2011. "Social Capital, Institutions and Growth: Further Lessons from the Italian Regional Divide," Working Paper CRENoS 201103, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  2. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "The Rule and the Exception: Italy’s Regional Imbalances (1891-2001) through a Shift-Share Analysis," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
  3. Giovanni Iuzzolino & Guido Pellegrini & Gianfranco Viesti, 2011. "Convergence among Italian Regions, 1861-2011," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 22, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Andrea Brandolini & Giovanni Vecchi, 2011. "The Well-Being of Italians: A Comparative Historical Approach," Quaderni di storia economica (Economic History Working Papers) 19, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  5. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "The determinants of Italy’s regional imbalances over the long run: exploring the contributions of human and social capital," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _088, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  6. Michele Capriati, 2011. "Public Expenditure and Human Development in the Italian Regions," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 2, June.
  7. Emanuele Felice, 2012. "Neither dashboard nor 'mashup' indices: an empirical wealth approach as a pathway to a comprehensive measure of development," UHE Working papers 2012_01, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Economia i Història Econòmica, Unitat d'Història Econòmica.
  8. Gabriele Cappelli, 2013. "Escaping from a human capital trap? Italy’s regions and the move to centralized primary schooling, 1861 - 1936," Department of Economics University of Siena 688, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  9. Emanuele Felice & Michelangelo Vasta, 2012. "Passive Modernization? The New Human Development Index and Its Components in Italy’s Regions (1871-2007)," UHE Working papers 2012_10, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Economia i Història Econòmica, Unitat d'Història Econòmica.
  10. Emanuele Felice, 2012. "Regional convergence in Italy, 1891–2001: testing human and social capital," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 6(3), pages 267-306, October.

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