Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Flexicurity Policies and their Association with Productivity in the European Union

Contents:

Author Info

  • Primož Dolenc
  • Suzana Laporšek
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The paper examines the issue of flexicurity in the EU Member States and studies the association between flexicurity policy components (i.e. employment protection legislation, lifelong learning programs, active and passive labour market policies) and labour and total factor productivity growth in 20 EU Member States over the 1991–2008 period. The empirical analysis pointed on the existence of large differences in the level of implementation of flexicurity policies across EU Member States, by which the least successful are NMS, especially with regard to active labour market and lifelong learning programs. As regards the relation between flexicurity variables and productivity growth, panel regression estimates showed that active labour market policies and participation in lifelong learning programs have a statistically significant positive association with labour and total factor productivity growth. On the other hand, rigid employment protection and high expenditures for passive labour market policies negatively relate to productivity growth.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.vse.cz/polek/download.php?jnl=pep&pdf=449.pdf
    Download Restriction: Restriction: free of charge

    File URL: http://www.vse.cz/pep/abstrakt.php?IDcl=449
    Download Restriction: Restriction: free of charge

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Economics, Prague in its journal Prague Economic Papers.

    Volume (Year): 2013 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 224-239

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpep:v:2013:y:2013:i:2:id:449:p:224-239

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: nam. W. Churchilla 4, 130 67 Praha 3
    Phone: (02) 24 09 51 11
    Fax: (02) 24 22 06 57
    Web page: http://www.vse.cz/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Postal: Editorial office Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, nám. W. Churchilla 4, 130 67 Praha 3, Czech Republic
    Email:
    Web: http://www.vse.cz/pep/

    Related research

    Keywords: productivity; labour market; flexicurity; European Union;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2005. "The impact of training on productivity and wages: evidence from British panel data," IFS Working Papers W05/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Andrea Bassanini & Luca Nunziata & Danielle Venn, 2009. "Job protection legislation and productivity growth in OECD countries," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 24, pages 349-402, 04.
    3. Hopenhayn, Hugo & Rogerson, Richard, 1993. "Job Turnover and Policy Evaluation: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(5), pages 915-38, October.
    4. Pierre Cahuc & Yann Algan, 2006. "Civic Attitudes and the Design of Labour Market Institutions: Which Countries Can Implement the Danish Flexicurity Model?," Sciences Po publications 5489, Sciences Po.
    5. Autor, David & Kerr, William & Kugler, Adriana, 2007. "Do Employment Protections Reduce Productivity? Evidence from U.S. States," IZA Discussion Papers 2571, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Scarpetta, Stefano & Tressel, Thierry, 2004. "Boosting productivity via innovation and adoption of new technologies : any role for labor market institutions?," Social Protection Discussion Papers 29144, The World Bank.
    7. Andrea Bassanini & Danielle Venn, 2007. "Assessing the Impact of Labour Market Policies on Productivity: A Difference-in-Differences Approach," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 54, OECD Publishing.
    8. Eric Bartelsman & Stefano Scarpetta & Fabiano Schivardi, 2005. "Comparative analysis of firm demographics and survival: evidence from micro-level sources in OECD countries," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 365-391, June.
    9. Michele Belot & Jan Boone & Jan Van Ours, 2007. "Welfare-Improving Employment Protection," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(295), pages 381-396, 08.
    10. Ayolt J. De Groot & J. Paul Elhorst, 2010. "Labour Market Effects Of Flexicurity From A Regional Perspective," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(4), pages 392-408, 09.
    11. Nickell, Stephen & Layard, Richard, 1999. "Labor market institutions and economic performance," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 46, pages 3029-3084 Elsevier.
    12. Igor Stubelj, 2010. "Valuation of Slovene Publicly Traded Companies with a Valuation Model Based on Expected Earnings and Growth Opportunities," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 8(1), pages 023-047.
    13. Parello, Carmelo Pierpaolo, 2011. "Labor market rigidity and productivity growth in a model of innovation-driven growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1058-1067, May.
    14. Markus Poschke, 2007. "Employment protection, firm selection, and growth," 2007 Meeting Papers 389, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    15. Acemoglu, D. & Shimer, R., 1997. "Efficient Unemployment Insurance," Working papers 97-9, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    16. Saint-Paul, G., 1995. "Is Labour Rigidity Harming Europe's Competitiveness? The Effect of Job Protection on the Pattern of Trade and Welfare," DELTA Working Papers 95-38, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    17. Koeniger, Winfried, 2005. "Dismissal costs and innovation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 79-84, July.
    18. Federico Cingano & Marco Leonardi & Julián Messina & Giovanni Pica, 2010. "The effects of employment protection legislation and financial market imperfections on investment: evidence from a firm-level panel of EU countries," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 25, pages 117-163, 01.
    19. Daron Acemoglu & Robert Shimer, 1999. "Productivity Gains from Unemployment Insurance," Working papers 99-29, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    20. John Bishop, 1994. "The Impact of Previous Training on Productivity and Wages," NBER Chapters, in: Training and the Private Sector, pages 161-200 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Andrea Ichino & Regina T. Riphahn, 2005. "The Effect of Employment Protection on Worker Effort: Absenteeism During and After Probation," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(1), pages 120-143, 03.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpep:v:2013:y:2013:i:2:id:449:p:224-239. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Vaclav Subrta).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.