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Deprivation, diet, and food-retail access: findings from the Leeds 'food deserts' study

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Author Info

  • Neil Wrigley
  • Daniel Warm
  • Barrie Margetts

Abstract

Within a context of public policy debate in the United Kingdom on social exclusion, health inequalities, and food poverty, the metaphor of the 'food desert' caught the imagination of those involved in policy development. Drawing from a major cross-disciplinary investigation of food access and food poverty in British cities, the authors report in this paper findings from the first 'before/after' study of food consumption in a highly deprived area of a British city experiencing a sudden and significant change in its food-retail access. The study has been viewed as the first opportunity in the United Kingdom to assess the impact of a non-healthcare intervention (specifically a retail-provision intervention) on food-consumption patterns, and by extension diet-related health, in such a deprived, previously poor-retail-access community. The paper offers evidence of a positive but modest impact of the retail intervention on diet, and the authors discuss the ways in which their findings are potentially significant in the context of policy debate.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Pion Ltd, London in its journal Environment and Planning A.

Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 151-188

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Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:35:y:2003:i:1:p:151-188

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Web page: http://www.pion.co.uk

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Cited by:
  1. Eckel, Carsten, 2007. "International trade and retailing: Diversity versus accessibility and the creation of retail deserts," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 66, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  2. Asfaw, Abay, 2007. "Supermarket purchases and the dietary patterns of households in Guatemala:," IFPRI discussion papers 696, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Andrews, Margaret S. & Bhatta, Rhea & Ver Ploeg, Michele, 2012. "Did the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Increase in SNAP Benefits Reduce the Impact of Food Deserts?," 2012 AAEA/EAAE Food Environment Symposium, May 30-31, Boston, MA 123520, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Caspi, Caitlin E. & Kawachi, Ichiro & Subramanian, S.V. & Adamkiewicz, Gary & Sorensen, Glorian, 2012. "The relationship between diet and perceived and objective access to supermarkets among low-income housing residents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(7), pages 1254-1262.

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