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Spatial flexibility in job mobility: macrolevel opportunities and microlevel restrictions

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  • Maarten van Ham
  • Clara H Mulder
  • Pieter Hooimeijer

Abstract

Disequilibria among regional labour markets persist through spatial inflexibility in job mobility resulting from restrict ions in migration and long-distance commuting. This contribution analyses workplace mobility -- the acceptance of a job at a great distance from the place of residence -- using a direct measure which includes both migration and long commutes as means for covering this distance. Two sources of spatial inflexibility are identified. The first is a low overall chance of general job mobility; the second is a limited search area leading to low workplace mobility. In a two-step analysis we show that workers who find another job are a highly selective group. Within this group the variation in accepting a job at a great distance is wide, because of the individual restrictions that are often gendered. We also show that ample availability of job opportunities stimulates general job mobility and reduces workplace mobility, but only after controlling for individual restrictions. These findings are in line with the spatial mismatch hypothesis.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Pion Ltd, London in its journal Environment and Planning A.

Volume (Year): 33 (2001)
Issue (Month): 5 (May)
Pages: 921-940

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Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:33:y:2001:i:5:p:921-940

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Web page: http://www.pion.co.uk

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Cited by:
  1. Inge Noback & Lourens Broersma & Jouke van Dijk, 2011. "Gender-specific dynamics in working hours," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1308, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Eriksson, Stefan & Lagerström, Jonas, 2008. "The Labor Market Consequences of Gender Differences in Job Search," Working Paper Series, Uppsala University, Department of Economics 2008:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  3. Sidonia von Proff & Thomas Brenner, 2011. "The Dynamics of Inter-Regional Collaboration – An Analysis of Co-Patenting," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2011-06, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  4. Christoph Kern, 2014. "Regional Structures and Mobility Dispositions: A Multilevel Proportional- & Partial-Proportional Odds Approach," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 681, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  5. Sidonia Proff & Thomas Brenner, 2014. "The dynamics of inter-regional collaboration: an analysis of co-patenting," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 52(1), pages 41-64, January.
  6. Hazans, Mihails, 2002. "Social returns to commuting in the Baltic states," ERSA conference papers ersa02p232, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Buchel, Felix & van Ham, Maarten, 2003. "Overeducation, regional labor markets, and spatial flexibility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 482-493, May.

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