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Urban evolution, self-organization, and decisionmaking

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  • P M Allen
  • M Sanglier
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    Abstract

    A dynamical model of a central place system is described which, derived from the concepts underlying dissipative structures, takes into account the self-organizing aspects of urban evolution, and shows the importance both of chance and of determinism in such systems. A theoretical evolution is discussed together with the modified dynamics of different possible decisions showing the long-term consequences of these. A recent application of this new theory to the evolution of the Bastogne region of Belgium is briefly described, and conclusions are drawn as to the real difficulties involved in decisionmaking on the part of national, regional, and municipal authorities.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Pion Ltd, London in its journal Environment and Planning A.

    Volume (Year): 13 (1981)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 167-183

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    Handle: RePEc:pio:envira:v:13:y:1981:i:2:p:167-183

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    Web page: http://www.pion.co.uk

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    Cited by:
    1. Gordon Mulligan & Mark Partridge & John Carruthers, 2012. "Central place theory and its reemergence in regional science," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 405-431, April.
    2. Portnov, Boris A. & Erell, Evyatar, 2004. "Interregional inequalities in Israel, 1948-1995: divergence or convergence?," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 255-289, December.
    3. Richard Arnott & Alex Anas & Kenneth Small, 1997. "Urban Spatial Structure," Boston College Working Papers in Economics, Boston College Department of Economics 388., Boston College Department of Economics.
    4. Rosser, J. Jr., 1996. "Development, geography, and economic theory : Paul Krugman (The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1995) pp. iii + 117, index, $20.00," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 450-454, December.
    5. Nijkamp, Peter & Reggiani, Aura, 1995. "Non-linear evolution of dynamic spatial systems. The relevance of chaos and ecologically-based models," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 183-210, April.

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