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Why Most Developing Countries Should Not Try New Zealand's Reforms

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  • Schick, Allen
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    Abstract

    During the past decade New Zealand has introduced far-reaching reforms in the structure and operation of government departments and agencies. This model has attracted interest in developing countries because it promises significant gains in operational efficiency. But developing countries, which are dominated by informal markets, are risky candidates for applying the New Zealand model. The author suggests that basic reforms to strengthen rule-based government and pave the way for robust markets should be undertaken first. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Research Observer.

    Volume (Year): 13 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 123-31

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:13:y:1998:i:1:p:123-31

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    1. R. Hirschowitz, 1989. "The Other Path: The Invisible Revolution in the Third World," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 57(4), pages 266-272, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Bjoern Dressel & Jim Brumby, 2012. "Enhancing Capabilities of Central Finance Agencies : From Diagnosis to Action," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12752, The World Bank.
    2. Verena Fritz & Edward Hedger & Ana Paula Fialho Lopes, 2011. "Strengthening Public Financial Management in Postconflict Countries," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10097, The World Bank.
    3. Anwar Shah, 1999. "Governing for Results in a Globalised and Localised World," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 385-431.
    4. Khaleghian, Peyvand & Gupta, Monica Das, 2005. "Public management and the essential public health functions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1083-1099, July.
    5. Craig, David & Porter, Doug, 2003. "Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers: A New Convergence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 53-69, January.
    6. McCourt, Willy, 2013. "Models of public service reform : a problem-solving approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6428, The World Bank.
    7. Minogue, Martin, 2005. "Apples and oranges: problems in the analysis of comparative regulatory governance," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(2-3), pages 195-214, May.
    8. Sophia Gollwitzer & Eteri Kvintradze & Tej Prakash & Luis-Felipe Zanna & Era Dabla-Norris & Richard Allen & Irene Yackovlev & Victor Duarte Lledo, 2010. "Budget Institutions and Fiscal Performance in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 10/80, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Louis Meuleman, 2010. "The Cultural Dimension of Metagovernance: Why Governance Doctrines May Fail," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 49-70, March.
    10. Wallis, Joe & Dollery, Brian, 2001. "Government Failure, Social Capital and the Appropriateness of the New Zealand Model for Public Sector Reform in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 245-263, February.
    11. Abu Sarker, 2005. "New Public Management, Service Provision and Non-Governmental Organizations in Bangladesh," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 249-271, September.
    12. Independent Evaluation Group, 2008. "Public Sector Reform: What Works and Why? An IEG evaluation of World Bank Support," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6484, February.
    13. Adrian Fozzard & Mick Foster, 2010. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," Working Papers id:3145, eSocialSciences.
    14. Abu Shiraz Rahaman, 2009. "Independent financial auditing and the crusade against government sector financial mismanagement in Ghana," Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 6(4), pages 224-246, November.
    15. Fozzard, Adrian & Foster, Mick, 2001. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Andrews, Matthew R., 2009. "Isomorphism and the Limits to African Public Financial Management Reform," Scholarly Articles 4415942, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    17. Manasan, Rosario G., 2000. "Public Sector Governance and the Medium-Term National Action Agenda for Productivity (MNAAP)," Discussion Papers DP 2000-24, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    18. Natasha Palmer & Anne Mills, 2003. "Classical versus relational approaches to understanding controls on a contract with independent GPs in South Africa," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(12), pages 1005-1020.
    19. Leonard, David K. & Bloom, Gerald & Hanson, Kara & O’Farrell, Juan & Spicer, Neil, 2013. "Institutional Solutions to the Asymmetric Information Problem in Health and Development Services for the Poor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 71-87.
    20. Gershberg, Alec Ian & González, Pablo Alberto & Meade, Ben, 2012. "Understanding and Improving Accountability in Education: A Conceptual Framework and Guideposts from Three Decentralization Reform Experiences in Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 1024-1041.
    21. Nick Manning & Neil Parison, 2004. "International Public Administration Reform : Implications for the Russian Federation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15068, February.

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