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Public Sector Reform in New Zealand and Its Relevance to Developing Countries

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Author Info

  • Bale, Malcolm
  • Dale, Tony

Abstract

Does New Zealand's success story have lessons for developing countries contemplating public sector reform? That question usually elicits one of two reactions, both inadvisable in the authors' view. The first reaction is to be impressed with the efficacy of the reforms and conclude that they should be adopted uncritically in other countries. The second reaction is that the special conditions existing in New Zealand are such that none of its reform experience is relevant to others. The authors take a middle position, maintaining that poorer countries can indeed extrapolate from the experience of their higher income neighbor despite the different conditions under which they have to operate. New Zealand's comprehensive overhaul of its public sector affords both general principles and specific elements relevant to countries looking to improve the quality, efficiency, and cost effectiveness of their public service sectors, and a careful analysis of those reforms can ascertain what might be transferable and what principles might apply. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Research Observer.

Volume (Year): 13 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 103-21

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Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:13:y:1998:i:1:p:103-21

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  1. Richard A. Posner, 1974. "Theories of Economic Regulation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 5(2), pages 335-358, Autumn.
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Cited by:
  1. Fozzard, Adrian & Foster, Mick, 2001. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Wallis, Joe & Dollery, Brian, 2001. "Government Failure, Social Capital and the Appropriateness of the New Zealand Model for Public Sector Reform in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 245-263, February.
  3. Chu, Ke-young, 2004. "A Model of a Rule of Law and a Rule of Man: Implications for the Design of Institutions," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  4. Rauch, James E & Evans, Peter B., 1999. "Bureaucratic Structure and Bureaucratic Performance in Less Developed Countries," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt0sb0w38d, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  5. Mccourt, Willy, 2012. "Can Top-Down and Bottom-Up be Reconciled? Electoral Competition and Service Delivery in Malaysia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2329-2341.
  6. Ian Lienert & Feridoun Sarraf, 2001. "Systemic Weaknesses of Budget Management in anglophone Africa," IMF Working Papers 01/211, International Monetary Fund.
  7. John Micklewright, 2003. "Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa03/25, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, revised 2003.
  8. Khaleghian, Peyvand & Gupta, Monica Das, 2005. "Public management and the essential public health functions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1083-1099, July.
  9. Khaleghian, Peyvand & Das Gupta Monica, 2004. "Public management and essential public health functions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3220, The World Bank.
  10. McCourt, Willy, 2013. "Models of public service reform : a problem-solving approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6428, The World Bank.
  11. Willy McCourt, 2007. "Impartiality through bureaucracy? A Sri Lankan approach to managing values," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 429-442.

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