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Community Targeting for Poverty Reduction in Burkina Faso

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  • Bigman, David, et al
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    Abstract

    This article develops a method for targeting antipoverty programs and public projects to poor communities in rural and urban areas. The method calls for constructing an extensive data set from a large number of sources and then integrating the entire set into a geographic information system. The data set includes demographic data from the population census; household-level data from a variety of surveys; community-level data on local road infrastructure, public facilities, water points, and so on; and department-level data on agroclimatic conditions. An econometric model that estimates the impact of household-, community-, and department-level variables on household consumption is used to identify the key explanatory variables that determine the standard of living in rural and urban areas. This model is then applied to predict poverty indicators for 3,871 rural and urban communities in Burkina Faso and to map the spatial distribution of poverty in the country. A simulation analysis assesses the effectiveness of village-level targeting based on these predictions. The results show that such targeting is an improvement over regional targeting in that it reduces leakage and undercoverage. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 167-93

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:14:y:2000:i:1:p:167-93

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    Cited by:
    1. Chikako Yamauchi, 2010. "Community-Based Targeting and Initial Local Conditions: Evidence from Indonesia's IDT Program," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 95-147, October.
    2. Francken, Nathalie & Minten, Bart & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2012. "The Political Economy of Relief Aid Allocation: Evidence from Madagascar," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 486-500.
    3. Fujii, Tomoki, 2004. "Commune-Level Estimation of Poverty Measures and its Application in Cambodia," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Jayne, Thomas S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2000. "Targeting Of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia: Chronic Need or Inertia?," Food Security International Development Papers 54048, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Jehu-Appiah, Caroline & Aryeetey, Genevieve & Spaan, Ernst & Agyepong, Irene & Baltussen, Rob, 2010. "Efficiency, equity and feasibility of strategies to identify the poor: An application to premium exemptions under National Health Insurance in Ghana," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(2-3), pages 166-173, May.
    6. Bellon, Mauricio R. & Hodson, David & Bergvinson, David & Beck, David & Martinez-Romero, Eduardo & Montoya, Yinha, 2005. "Targeting agricultural research to benefit poor farmers: Relating poverty mapping to maize environments in Mexico," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 476-492.
    7. Mogues, Tewodaj & Petracco, Carly & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2011. "The wealth and gender distribution of rural services in Ethiopia: A public expenditure benefit incidence analysis," IFPRI discussion papers 1057, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
    9. Bigman, David & Srinivasan, P. V., 2002. "Geographical targeting of poverty alleviation programs: methodology and applications in rural India," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 237-255, June.
    10. Hyman, Glenn & Larrea, Carlos & Farrow, Andrew, 2005. "Methods, results and policy implications of poverty and food security mapping assessments," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 453-460.
    11. Nikos Tzavidis & Nicola Salvati & Monica Pratesi & Ray Chambers, 2008. "M-quantile models with application to poverty mapping," Statistical Methods and Applications, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 393-411, July.
    12. Farrow, Andrew & Larrea, Carlos & Hyman, Glenn & Lema, German, 2005. "Exploring the spatial variation of food poverty in Ecuador," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 510-531.

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